Tag Archives: Stability

4 Aj (12th April 2017)

4 AjThe combination of the noble authority of the nawal Aj and the stability of the number 4 should give rise to dependable and solid day. This is a day of support and courage, particularly for those who take the lead.

There is possibly no greater steadying influence greater than that of the nawal Aj. Aj is the one who keeps order, the pillar which both supports and sustains. It keeps everything in its rightful place in order to bring harmony and growth to the community it supports. It brings leadership qualities of the most altruistic kind. It provides an energy which organises to ensure that the community is cared for.

Today it is combined with the number 4. This brings with it an essence of stability, particularly in the Earthly plane. This represents the most basic level of the material existence. This could be seen as the arrival of of a stable leader who will work to ensure that the most basic of material needs are fulfilled. It does not necessarily take into account any other planes of existence, the focus is purely in our world.

This is a day to put your energy into ensuring that the basic needs of your family and community are met. It is a day to focus on supporting people through real world issues, rather than existential dilemmas.

The Temple of the Foliated Cross. This small and unassuming temple houses one of the most remarkable and beautiful friezes, the Foliated Cross, the featured image of this article. Together with those of the Temple of the Sun and the Temple of the Cross, this forms an architectural version of a codex, showing both mythic and historical accounts of the ruling dynasty. The three temples together form the cross group, the sacred heart of the beautiful site of Palenque. Picture by Mark Elmy

The nawal Aj is related to many things which generally revolve around leadership on an earthly level. It is sometimes known as the cornstalk, sometimes the staff of life. It represents the spinal column within the body, that which allows us to stand tall, proud and brave. As the cornstalk, it has its roots in the Earth, and its head in the sky. As we are the people of maize, if we wish to lead in a just manner, we should cultivate our connection with the Heart of the Sky and the Heart of the Earth.

Foliated crossThis is a picture of the carving at the top of one of my favourite Mayan temples, the Temple of the Foliated Cross on the site of Palenque (Bàakʼ) in Chiapas, Mexico. At the top of the tablet you see a bird, which represents the Heart of the Sky, the face with the large rectangular (crossed) eyes at the base of the cross represents the Heart of the Earth. The foliated cross is a stylised maize plant with the heads of humans emerging. This is Aj bringing life to the world. It is the central pillar, that which supports life. It is represented by the staffs carried by the elders of Mayan communities to this day. 

Aj is an authority, it is gentle, yet noble. It works quietly for the community it leads. It does not seek the limelight. This is a day that seeks sustenance for its people, that keeps everything in its rightful place. It is a day where we ask for the courage and bravery to stand up straight and tall, to do the right thing.

The number 4 is very important within Mayan mythology. Four represents the cardinal points, the four colours of maize, the four carriers of the year, the two equinoxes and two solstices, as well as midnight, sunrise, midday and sunset. The number four is representative of the four first men, who raised the sky from the sea to create the world we live on. In Mayan myth it is four pillars that support the sky from the Earth. As you can imagine, four is a number which represents stability, a solar number. Even though it is still low, it is thought of as a beneficial number.

6 Iq’ (1st April 2017)

6 Iq'If you have something important to say, today is a very auspicious day for it as the nawal governing communication combines with the number which represents stability.

In addition to its connection with communication, the nawal Iq’ also governs change. Change can be unsettling, especially when the wind blows wild and the changes happen suddenly and without warning. However, the stabilising influence of the energy of the number 6 may bring some stability to the changes which have been occurring. This could be seen as a day where the energy  is more in line with bringing balanced, measured and stable changes. If you have changes to make, you could find the powerful energy of the wind assisting you today.

However, the movement of the divine breath, inspiring our words, is one of the key aspects of the day. This is a day when it flows gracefully, not too strongly and not too weakly. It empowers our words with sufficient strength to have an impact, yet balances them with a gentle calmness. Its combination with the number 6 draws on the properties of the four directions – vitality, wisdom, spirit and healing – and combined with the inspiration of Sky and the compassion of Earth.

This gives rise to an extremely conducive energy for any form of communication, but, of course, verbal communication is where the greatest potential occurs. This is a day for clear and effective conversations, a day to get your point across and to hear that of others. If there is something you have been struggling to say, today you might be able to find the words.

The number 6 also highlights family, and bringing the family into balance, this may be where your communication may be greatly effective and appreciated.

Wind God 1


It has now been 40 days since the beginning of the new Mayan solar year, according to the classical count of Highland Guatemala. It is said that maize planted in the first two months of the solar year Nab’e Mam or Rukub Mam will not grow tall, it reaches old age prematurely and does not bear a particularly good harvest. Today we begin the month Likin Ka, the time of the soft earth, when the first rains are due to come, and the time to plant the new crop has arrived. With the correct timing we can be sure that our crop will grow well, it will be strong and vital.


An additional mention should be made today of the start of the Archaeological new solar year, the Ha’ab. Today is the day 0 Pop in the Ha’ab count which is also used in Mexico by those who follow Mayan calendar systems. It is exactly 40 day behind the Macewal Q’ij used here in most of the Guatemalan highlands. So, I would like to wish our Mexican and archaeologist friends a prosperous new solar year, 6 Iq’.

Old man possum brings the nawal Iq’ to take the burden of time for the year. From the Dresden Codex.

Nawal Iq’ is another strong nawal. It represents communication and particularly divine inspiration. It is the wind, the breath of life, that which brings the change in seasons.

The communication brought by Iq’ can be enlightening and inspiring. It is the breath of the divine which flows through us all, in fact the word for soul is Saq Iq’ – white breath. When our breath stops, our divine essence leaves our physical body. When we engage ourselves with the divine breath we are able to create, to manifest with our words, to inspire those around us. However, Iq’ also has a destructive side. It has the ability to blow like a hurricane and may level everything before it. It is the angry words which cut down everything in their path.

Hurricane is one of the few English words which is actually derived from a Mayan word- Junrakan, meaning “one footed”. Junrakan is another name for the Heart of the Sky, one of the creator deities. Once again it seems that certain patterns follow through the sequence of the nawales which are interrelated. Imox, the female creative principle, or egg, is fertilised be Iq’, the male principle. Their combination results in Aq’ab’al, the conception and a change in the state, bringing the dream into reality.

Iq’ is a day of communication, a day of inspiration. It can be a great day to express yourself through written or particularly verbal means. It is also a day on which changes happen. You can either embrace those changes or resist them, but be aware that the wind blows forcefully and resistance of change requires a great deal of energy. Embracing change helps you to learn to dance like a leaf in the wind.

The number six is said to be the number of ultimate stability. It is the first of the three middle numbers of the cycle, the balance point neither too strong nor too weak. It is a day frequently used for ceremony thanks to its conducive energy. It represents the four directions with the Heart of the Sky and the Heart of the Earth. It also represents family, relating to the six qualities that nourish and hold families together – health, understanding, property, employment, friendship and actions.

The cross at the top of the central hill, Paclom, in Momostenango. Paclom is known as "the six place" and the two armed cross represents the four directions combining with the Heart of the Earth and the Heart of the Sky. This picture was taken on Wajxakib B'atz, February 2010.
The cross at the top of the central hill, Paclom, in Momostenango. Paclom is known as “the six place” and the two armed cross represents the four directions combining with the Heart of the Earth and the Heart of the Sky. This picture was taken on Wajxakib B’atz, February 2010.

6 Toj (19th March 2017)

6 TojAs the nawal Toj represents offerings , it also represents debts. Here we see the two coming into balance. This is a day to bring stability by ensuring payments are made.

The number 6 is seen as representing the six values of the family. At least three of those can be directly related to finances – property, employment and actions. Issues with any of those may lead to incurring debts which put the family out of balance and cause disharmony in the home.

Today is a day to focus on familiar debts in particular, to bring harmony to the family by paying off anything which is outstanding. Additionally this is a potent day to make some forward payment, to get yourself in credit in preparation for future events. Whilst this is all phrased in a financial way, it is of course just an expression of what is happening on an energetic level.

When we make fire ceremonies, we do not offer money to the fire. We make offerings of flowers, incense and candles, but more importantly, we make offerings of our words and our time. These are the most valuable payments we can make, our life breath and our life energy. They are the most precious resources at your disposal to bring stability to your family. These resources can be used in a ceremonial way, or they can just be used within your family. This is the day to repay the goodwill shown within your family through your words and your deeds. This brings balance into your home, it keeps everything healthy on both the physical and energetic levels. After all, they will be empowered by the four directions, the Heart of the Earth and the Heart of the Sky.


The nawal Toj represents offerings and payment. It is part of the name Tojil, a Mayan god who gave fire to the people, although this was not a free gift. Tojil asked in return for sacrifice to be made. This is a day of payment and sacrifice, a day to resolve debts, both in the physical and spiritual realms. Toj is the nawal of the sacred fire, and it is to the fire that we make offerings in order to burn away what would commonly be known as karmic debts. In this way we restore balance, we bring our accounts back to zero.

Toj carries with it a form of divine protection, which is enhanced through selfless acts. These acts might involve a sacrifice of our time or energy in order to strengthen our community. We can choose to act or we can choose to ignore, but be aware – ignoring an opportunity to make a payment on a Toj day might bring a ill fortune, the removal of the protection. Payment should be made with an open heart, thanks might not be quickly forthcoming, and may not come at all. Your sacrifice could be  something as simple as picking up litter in your neighbourhood, it doesn’t have to be something elaborate.

The number six is said to be the number of ultimate stability. It is the first of the three middle numbers of the cycle, the balance point neither too strong nor too weak. It is a day frequently used for ceremony thanks to its conducive energy. It represents the four directions with the Heart of the Sky and the Heart of the Earth. It also represents family, relating to the six qualities that nourish and hold families together – health, understanding, property, employment, friendship and actions.

The cross at the top of the central hill, Paclom, in Momostenango. Paclom is known as "the six place" and the two armed cross represents the four directions combining with the Heart of the Earth and the Heart of the Sky. This picture was taken on Wajxakib B'atz, February 2010.
The cross at the top of the central hill, Paclom, in Momostenango. Paclom is known as “the six place” and the two armed cross represents the four directions combining with the Heart of the Earth and the Heart of the Sky. This picture was taken on Wajxakib B’atz, February 2010.

4 Kej (17th March 2017)

4 KejStrength that brings stability is especially highlighted today as both the nawal Kej and the number 4 combine their properties. Each can be seen as representations of the Four Pillars, keeping everything in its rightful place.

The nawal Kej is known for its strength, which sometimes can become a little domineering. It is not necessarily meant that way, after all it is a nawal of spiritual leadership and truly has the interests of its followers at heart.

Kej brings the strength to make the difference, but the number 4 tempers it to bring this strength in a carefully measured, balanced way. It is strength empowered by the qualities of the four directions – vitality, wisdom, spirit and healing – which brings the material world into being. This can very much be seen as the day which represents the four first men, the four first leaders, the Bacab’ob – Balam Kitze, Balam Acab, Majutujaj and Balam Ikim. These were the four first humans created and were seen as the spiritual leaders of the patrilineages, as well as the forefathers. As such they formed the base for all who followed on from them, and their stability allowed the human race to flourish.

Today the strength of Kej should be particularly useful. There could be no more significant day to represent a strong foundation, or an energy of bringing strength and stability to a situation. It is a day to step forward and take charge of matters if they need resolving.

Equally, the nawal Kej is the representative of the natural world and Kej days are excellent days to spend in the wilderness. If you are feeling a little weakened or out of balance, today is a powerful day to take a walk in the woods in order to re-energise yourself and bring yourself back into equilibrium.

Xbalamkiej, patron of the day Kej one of the hero twins from the Popol Vuh. From the Dresden Codex
Xbalamkiej, patron of the day Kej one of the hero twins from the Popol Vuh. From the Dresden Codex

Kej is possibly the strongest of the nawales, it is powerful, but in a different way to Kan. Kej is energetic, lively and determined. It is the nawal of nature, of the wilderness and it is this power that it draws on. The animal totem of Kej is the deer, but if you have fragile, new-born Bambi in mind, think again. This is the majestic stag, standing on the mountain surveying his domain. Whilst most nawales are not necessarily engendered, Kej is most definitely masculine. Both men and women that carry Kej as their nawal have great strength, although the men tend to hide their strength more. Kej women are particularly driven, resourceful and brave, sometimes to the point of being rather dominant. All radiate an aura of nobility, people tend to look to them to lead.

Kej is the nawal of the Mayan “religion”, a day of spiritual leaders, of shaman and of priests. It is these leaders who understand how to read the messages from the natural world, who help to keep our existence in balance with nature. It is a day to connect with the wilderness and draw the power of the natural world into you, to harmonise and replenish.

The number 4 is very important within Mayan mythology. Four represents the cardinal points, the four colours of maize, the four carriers of the year, the two equinoxes and two solstices, as well as midnight, sunrise, midday and sunset. The number four is representative of the four first men, who raised the sky from the sea to create the world we live on. In Mayan myth it is four pillars that support the sky from the Earth. As you can imagine, four is a number which represents stability, a solar number. Even though it is still low, it is thought of as a beneficial number.

6 Ajmak (6th March 2017)

6 AjmakToday Ajmak, the nawal of forgiveness and ancestors, combines with the number representing the stability and family. This could be one of the most important days to settle any family issues.

As humans move through life, things happen. We make choices and decisions, some of which we may have made differently with the benefit of hindsight. The results of our decisions have impacts on others. Some it may bring some people closer, or may drive others further away. If they are mere acquaintances, they may come and go at different points through life, however, if they are family there is a much closer bond. You may be lucky enough to have a family that stick by you through thick and thin, that support your decisions. Sometimes they may support you while not agreeing with your decisions or actions. If you are really unfortunate, you may be at odds with your ancestors, such are the differences in your values.

The trecena of B’atz has a theme of creation, of weaving things together. Support from our ancestors can bring us great strength on our journey, and bring the sweetness into our lives. With the number 6 highlighting the family, today brings the energy of resolution of differences within your family. If there are outstanding matters causing friction with your ancestors, today is the day to sort them out. Whether forgiveness is what you need to ask for, or what you need to give, great stability can be created today through this action.

I’m sorry

Please forgive me

Thank you

I love you


When the creators fashioned the four first men, the Bacab’ob, they created them as equals. These four first humans had superhuman abilities, including the ability to see through space and time. As equals were not desired, the gods smoked the mirror of perception, giving us our human set of senses. When we lost the ability to see through time, we lost the ability to see the true consequences of our actions and thus we needed to start asking for forgiveness. Sometimes even well meaning actions can cause problems at a later date. Ajmak represents this ability to forgive others, the ability to forgive ourselves and the ability to accept forgiveness.

Ajmak is a sensual energy, which creates some of the reasons for its needing to be forgiven. It is kind and very lovable, but irresponsible. It can be a very talented energy, with great ideas. However it can also be very easily distracted, especially by anything that makes it feel nice. This often leads Ajmak to failing to fulfil its true potential, although due to its lovable nature it is easy to forgive. One of the lessons with regards to the Ajmak energy is learning to forgive oneself.

The number six is said to be the number of ultimate stability. It is the first of the three middle numbers of the cycle, the balance point neither too strong nor too weak. It is a day frequently used for ceremony thanks to its conducive energy. It represents the four directions with the Heart of the Sky and the Heart of the Earth. It also represents family, relating to the six qualities that nourish and hold families together – health, understanding, property, employment, friendship and actions.

The cross at the top of the central hill, Paclom, in Momostenango. Paclom is known as "the six place" and the two armed cross represents the four directions combining with the Heart of the Earth and the Heart of the Sky. This picture was taken on Wajxakib B'atz, February 2010.
The cross at the top of the central hill, Paclom, in Momostenango. Paclom is known as “the six place” and the two armed cross represents the four directions combining with the Heart of the Earth and the Heart of the Sky. This picture was taken on Wajxakib B’atz, February 2010.

4 Ix (4th March 2017)

4 IxStability of your connection to the spirit of Mother Earth and the abundance that comes from her is highlighted today. It is a day to manifest this into the physical realm.

The nawal Ix brings us the ability to call on mother Earth to provide us with the materials we require to walk our path. We do this simply by asking, by using our words, particularly at special places such as shrines or altars. With this day carrying the number 4, the energy of nawal Ix is empowered by the qualities of the four directions – strength, wisdom, spirit and healing. These are the qualities that support the stability of what they are attached to. Hence, asking for what you need in life is likely to yield a positive result.

The nawal Ix also had a deeply esoteric side, however it is termed the simplest word to describe its gift is magic. We may shy away from the use of such words, but Ix enhances our ability to co- create with our surroundings. It reminds us that the power to shape our environment is in our hands, as is the responsibility. The energy of 4 Ix suggests that our ability to co-create, our “magic”, may be quite apparent in the physical realm today. In fact, today it may be easier than usual to manifest our desires into the physical, be aware of what you are creating and be prepared to take responsibility for your creation.

The day 4 Ix is a day to remember to give thanks for what you have asked for, what has manifested into your physical world. It is a good day to show your gratitude to mother Earth by doing something physically to restore your balance with her.

Jaguar Shaman
A dancing shaman transforms himself into a jaguar. From a late classic era vase found at Altar de Sacrificios. Source http://shortstreet.net/Maya/mayapaintedvases.htm

Ix is possibly the most feminine of the nawales. It represents the spirit of Mother Earth and could easily be seen as a Mayan representation of Gaia. Ix can be seen as a mothering energy, nurturing all things, but this should not be confused with weakness – the animal totem of Ix is the jaguar, and it is as the jaguar that Ix is often known. The jaguar is, of course, powerful and stealthy. Ix also embodies these qualities. The jaguar is an animal of the night, slipping magically through the darkness, the spots of her back a representation of the milky way. She carries the sun on it’s nightly journey through the underworld.

The connection Ix has with the Earth gives it the ability to manifest material wealth. In the Mayan cross astrological configuration, Kame evolves to Ix. In the Popol Vuh, the sacred book of the Maya, the Hero Twins sacrificed themselves in the underworld (Kame) and then were resurrected as a pair of catfish, later to become travelling magicians (Ix.) They cut the heads off animals, then resurrected them, they even cut off each others heads and brought each other back to life. In these scenes they are shown with patches of jaguar skin on their clothing, a symbolism denoting that the wearer is a shaman. Thus through the symbolic death or sacrifice, the shamanic power emerges.

Industrialised societies tend to see the Earth as an inanimate source of material wealth. Non-industrialised societies see her as a living entity with whom we can interact, and she carries the nawal Ix. So, it is on Ix days that prayers are offered at her places, the shrines and altars, her ears, to ask for what we need in our world.

Whilst Ix has the power to engage with the magic of the Earth, it also has a tendency towards illness. This is particularly strong when the vain, ungrateful side of Ix emerges. The magic that runs through this nawal comes so easily, that sometimes it forgets that everything really comes from the Earth and it is to the Earth that we must show our gratitude. Ix is also the nawal of natural shrines and altars, the places where fire ceremonies are made to give thanks. A spirit of gratitude and humility keeps Ix healthy. Ix is of course deeply connected with the natural world and it is here that they find their wisdom, power and wealth. This is a day to give thanks, to remember gratitude, and a day to engage with your magic.

The number 4 is very important within Mayan mythology. Four represents the cardinal points, the four colours of maize, the four carriers of the year, the two equinoxes and two solstices, as well as midnight, sunrise, midday and sunset. The number four is representative of the four first men, who raised the sky from the sea to create the world we live on. In Mayan myth it is four pillars that support the sky from the Earth. As you can imagine, four is a number which represents stability, a solar number. Even though it is still low, it is thought of as a beneficial number.

6 Aq’ab’al (21st February 2017)

6 Aq'ab'alAfter the rather wavering energy of the last few days, today is a day where we might expect to see the emergence of a new and stable concept.

Aq’ab’al days are generally seen as being fortunate days, days on which the new dawn occurs. They are a bridge between the dream world and the physical, calling the fleeting images from our dreams into our conscious minds so that we can begin to create concepts from them. It is our bridge to the collective consciousness (seen in Imox), connecting the dreaming world and the waking world. It is the fertilised egg, newly implanted in the mothers womb; it has passed from being the dream of a child in the parents’ mind into a physical presence, but is yet to emerge into the light of the physical world.

Through these images we understand the energy of Aq’ab’al days. They are days of new beginnings, where new concepts are brought into existence. They still need work to complete them, they need to be gestate, to be nurtured, before they can stand alone.

However, today we see the energy of Aq’ab’al combined with the number 6, the number of ultimate stability.  The new conception is not some vague idea, shrouded in the early light of dawn. The light of the sun is fully on its way, we know for certain that the new day, the new life, is coming. The inspiration of the Heart of the Sky and the Heart of the Earth are infused into this concept, bringing something to the physical plane which has a touch of the divine about it.

Whilst new concepts may cause some dissent from the people they are introduced to, this is unlikely today. This is an excellent day to unveil your new project to the world, even if it is not fully finished yet. Time and nurture will help to complete the process, but even as a concept it is entirely possible to see its potential.

Dawn over Lake Atitlan, 21st February 2016, as seen from the garden of Flower House, San Pablo La Laguna. Picture by Mark Elmy

In the K’iche’ language, the word aq’ab means night. The suffix -al changes the meaning slightly, to hint at change and alludes to the dawning of the day, the time between darkness and light, night and day. Just as birth is the beginning of the mortal journey, Aq’ab’al is the beginning of the day, although the detail of the day may still be obscured. Aq’ab’al is representative of new things, things which are not yet fully formed. While in Santiago Atitlan one day, a friend explained to me the different parts of a weaving in process on a backstrap loom. Aq’ab’al is the warp (the vertical threads), B’atz is the weft (the horizontal threads) which creates the whole cloth, and the newly woven cloth is Kawok. In order for the weaver to create, first she has an idea in her head or a dream. She sets out the dream on her loom by setting up the warp. Thus, the design has passed from being just an idea, to the beginnings of a woven reality, although it still requires creative input before it becomes whole. Aq’ab’al can also represent conception, the fertilised egg is far from ready to be born, but has passed from the dream or spirit world into the physical.

Aq’ab’al days are great days for the start of new things, particularly new relationships – Aq’ab’al has a strong affinity with marriage. It is also a perfect day for starting new projects, or at least bringing them into the world of light from the world of dreams and ideas.

The number six is said to be the number of ultimate stability. It is the first of the three middle numbers of the cycle, the balance point neither too strong nor too weak. It is a day frequently used for ceremony thanks to its conducive energy. It represents the four directions with the Heart of the Sky and the Heart of the Earth. It also represents family, relating to the six qualities that nourish and hold families together – health, understanding, property, employment, friendship and actions.

The cross at the top of the central hill, Paclom, in Momostenango. Paclom is known as "the six place" and the two armed cross represents the four directions combining with the Heart of the Earth and the Heart of the Sky. This picture was taken on Wajxakib B'atz, February 2010.
The cross at the top of the central hill, Paclom, in Momostenango. Paclom is known as “the six place” and the two armed cross represents the four directions combining with the Heart of the Earth and the Heart of the Sky. This picture was taken on Wajxakib B’atz, February 2010.

4 Imox (19th February 2017)

4 ImoxThe energy of the nawal Imox can have some overwhelming properties if the connection to the collective consciousness is over-emphasised. However, today it moderated by the gentle, balanced energy of the number four.

Imox can give rise to some of the most amazing innovations and creations, after all, it represents the place from where all emerges. It also represents the dream state, the muse that inspires at such a primal level you might not always notice its influence to begin with. It provides glimpses of possible futures and connections with those around us. These can be subtle feelings and sensations which lead us towards concepts and ideas. This can create confusion, especially if we cannot differentiate between sensations which are truly ours, and those which we pick up from the consciousness of our community.

The combination of the energy of the nawal Imox with the number 4 gives us the ability to bring some stability to those flashes of inspiration. This can help us to bring our dreams towards a physical reality, it may also help us to stabilise the “chatter” we pick from the collective consciousness.

White water lilies. There is some evidence that the flowers were used by the priest/kings to induce visions of the otherworld. Picture by Elise Lutz
White water lilies. There is some evidence that the flowers were used by the priest/kings to induce visions of the otherworld. Picture by Elise Lutz

Nawal Imox represents the collective consciousness, the great ocean. It is the moment before the “big bang”, when all that existed was the dream of the creator. It is everything and nothing in one place, the ovum from which reality was conceived. Imox is still very much in the other world, requiring another component to physically manifest the dream into reality.

Imox is considered to be a feminine nawal. Sometimes called water lily, sometimes crocodile, it is an embodiment of the primordial. It was from the great ocean that the four first men raised sky to create the world which we inhabit. Imox can also be seen as the Darwinian swamp from which all life emerged. It is fertile and creative, the mother that gave birth to our entire reality.

As the water lily, Imox is probably a representative of  Nymphaea alba, the white water lily. It has been suggested that the white water lily was smoked by the ancient Maya in a similar way to the blue lotus was used by the Egyptians. It was a plant which allowed access to the otherworld, a plant from which visions came if used correctly.

Imox is our common origin, and as such links us all together. It is the place of dreams, the collective conscious we delve into on our nightly voyages. It may also relate to the place that certain plant medicines take us to in order to bring us wisdom. However, as the font of all of creation, Imox harbours the dark as well as the light. When faced with the entirety of creation, the line between sanity and madness may become blurred.

Imox is a day to celebrate the spirit of the times, to understand the collective mind, particularly of humanity. It is a day to dream your creations, your art, your music. It is a day when we may all feel connected, a day when the psychic field between us may be particularly strong. Discernment may be called for, to understand when to dissociate from the collective, to remember your individuality, and to pull yourself back out of the dream world.

The number 4 is very important within Mayan mythology. Four represents the cardinal points, the four colours of maize, the four carriers of the year, the two equinoxes and two solstices, as well as midnight, sunrise, midday and sunset. The number four is representative of the four first men, who raised the sky from the sea to create the world we live on. In Mayan myth it is four pillars that support the sky from the Earth. As you can imagine, four is a number which represents stability, a solar number. Even though it is still low, it is thought of as a beneficial number.

6 N’oj (26th January 2017)

6 N'ojN’oj, the nawal of the brain and thought is embellished by the number 6 which brings a higher essence into the physical ideas. Today, inspiration may come from more than just what you see around you.

As the trecena of E’ unfolds, today we are entering the balanced period, the sixth, seventh and eighth days which are considered to be some of the easier days to negotiate. The energies of these days are generally conducive in combination with the nawales they are paired with. The E’ trecena can be a time not just of a new direction or new path, but also of new discoveries. The day 6 N’oj would suggest a little help comes from the other realms to help to piece together the new ideas and information you may be discovering in this journey. The path is not always straight and even, sometimes there are blockages and obstructions to overcome. The energy of the day 6 N’oj can bring divinely inspired ideas of how to move through obstacles in the path, ideas which are practical and relevant in the physical world, yet simultaneously fulfil a greater purpose.

In February 2016 we started the Mayan solar year on the day 4 N’oj, a day (and year) for bringing plans and ideas into the physical world. It has been 240 days since the start of the year 4 N’oj, we are entering the eighteenth, and final full, 20 day period of the solar year, or Macewal Q’ij, on the day 6 N’oj. Today is the first day of Uchum translated as the season of second sowingIn some fields, the new maize is already growing, and here is the time that the fields which have been burnt during Qib Ixik are sown. The seeds which are planted receive the final blessings of the old Mam 4 N’oj, his last breath before his final appearance as 13 N’oj, the herald of the Wayeb, the five directionless days at the end of the solar year.

A depiction of the Earth Lord, the patron of the day Caban (N’oj). He makes a sacrifice of his own blood so that the maize, sustenance of the people, will sprout. Representative of fertility and abundance through the cycle of life, death and resurrection. From the Dresden Codex.

The nawal N’oj is the nawal of thought, of intelligence and intellect. Within the count of days, there are two geniuses. B’atz is the creative genius, N’oj the intellectual one. N’oj is an energy of masculine, logical thought. N’oj is the problem solver, it gives ideas and solutions which work in the real world. N’oj gives a different way to understand situations, and through this ability comes innovation. It is thought, but also understanding and, indeed, knowing. As such, N’oj is also a day associated with divination.

This energy is not necessarily social, it can lead to becoming absorbed into one’s work, lost in one’s thoughts. The influence of N’oj can create ideas which may be very much ahead of their time. Do not be surprised if ideas you have on this day take a little time to catch on, the people you express the ideas to may need a little time to process, to see the genius within the idea.

N’oj is also one of the classic year bearers, or year lords. As a year bearer it is thought to be one of the more beneficial and benign energies. This year, which runs from February 21st 2016 to February 19th 2017,  is the year 4 N’oj.

The number six is said to be the number of ultimate stability. It is the first of the three middle numbers of the cycle, the balance point neither too strong nor too weak. It is a day frequently used for ceremony thanks to its conducive energy. It represents the four directions with the Heart of the Sky and the Heart of the Earth. It also represents family, relating to the six qualities that nourish and hold families together – health, understanding, property, employment, friendship and actions.

The cross at the top of the central hill, Paclom, in Momostenango. Paclom is known as "the six place" and the two armed cross represents the four directions combining with the Heart of the Earth and the Heart of the Sky. This picture was taken on Wajxakib B'atz, February 2010.
The cross at the top of the central hill, Paclom, in Momostenango. Paclom is known as “the six place” and the two armed cross represents the four directions combining with the Heart of the Earth and the Heart of the Sky. This picture was taken on Wajxakib B’atz, February 2010.

4 Tz’ikin (24th January 2017)

4 Tz'ikinThe nawal of prosperity and vision combined with the number of stability should give some interesting properties to this day. This is the day to ground your vision, to bring your inspiration into prosperous physical reality.

It is possible that the prosperity of the nawal Tz’ikin comes from its foresight. Tz’ikin is an energy which connects the sky to the surface of the Earth, these being the domains of the bird. When flying high, the bird can see the way ahead, it is able to perceive this new path stretching out ahead of us. We are only on the fourth day of this trecena of E’, the new path that we are taking, and today gives us an opportunity to envision the path ahead. When we have prior knowledge of both the challenges and the benefits of the path, we are able to take appropriate action. With the benefit of foresight, the appropriate action leads to prosperity, the ability to walk our path happily, supported on our journey. When we combine these properties with the physical stability of the number 4, very much representing the Earthly plane, it becomes obvious that manifesting your vision into the physical today is likely to bring success.

In the ancient Mayan reliefs, the Principle Bird Deity is an aspect of Itzamna, the ancient creator sky god. Having such a connection to a creator, gives Tz’ikin a great ability to rise above those around it, seeking perfection as it reaches towards the Heart of the Sky. It also gives it the ability to create through its voice. Tz’ikin days are days to ask for what you would like to bring into your life, what you would manifest into your world. You might use your words in prayer or in everyday life, to your peers, your boss or your bank manager! Today is a day when those words should carry an essence of order, and should lead to a physical result. It should also be noted that the power of creativity through words is highlighted on Tz’ikin days, these are days to watch your speech and be aware of what you are asking for.

Itzamna, the principle bird deity, from the "Hero Twins" frieze on the Tecolote pyramid complex at El Mirador. Photo by Mark Elmy
Itzamna, the principle bird deity, from the “Hero Twins” frieze on the Tecolote pyramid complex at El Mirador. Photo by Mark Elmy

 

The nawal Tz’ikin is a nawal of good fortune, almost literally. Tz’ikin is another manifestation and abundance day, a day of prosperity which comes through vision. The word Tz’ikin means bird, although many like to relate it to the Quetzal bird or Eagle. Where the nawal Ix is connected with the Heart of the Earth, Tz’ikin is connected with the Heart of the Sky. In the foliated cross representation of Aj, we saw the bird deity sitting atop the cross representing the Heart of the Sky. Whilst all is one in the general overview, we could see Ix as representing the female principle (Earth energy / yin) and Tz’ikin as representing the male principle (Sky energy / yang).

A nawal of prosperity, sometimes seems odd to people seeking “higher knowledge”. It is not quite seen the same here. If your family is starving, you are more likely to fall off the good road, perhaps into dishonesty or criminal activity. By asking nawal Tz’ikin for prosperity in your life, you are more likely to be relaxed, to be able to help others and to be more constructive within your community. That is not to say that your own input of hard work will not be necessary, just that it is hard work that will pay off.

Tz’ikin has the ability to give visions, it helps people to see the bigger picture within life. It also helps people to focus on details. It has grand aspirations and helps people to rise to the top of their abilities, which of course brings them prosperity.

Just as Tz’ikin can focus, it’s broad vision can occasionally cause distraction. Sometimes, just when it is heading towards it’s goal it can be distracted by something “shiny.” This energy gives an ability to create great social networks, but sometimes spends too much time trying to maintain them.

The number 4 is very important within Mayan mythology. Four represents the cardinal points, the four colours of maize, the four carriers of the year, the two equinoxes and two solstices, as well as midnight, sunrise, midday and sunset. The number four is representative of the four first men, who raised the sky from the sea to create the world we live on. In Mayan myth it is four pillars that support the sky from the Earth. As you can imagine, four is a number which represents stability, a solar number. Even though it is still low, it is thought of as a beneficial number.