Tag Archives: War

Superior Conjunction of Venus Begins – 10 Ajpu (25th November 2017)

The cycle of Venus was used by the ancient Maya to time many ritual practices, including war and sacrifice. The heliacal rising of Venus, when Venus is seen to rise with the Sun, was seen as a particularly destructive and unsettled time.  Venus has been rising heliacally since 8 K’at (3rd April 2017). The period since the beginning of the heliacal rise of Venus seems to have been a great turmoil for many.  It was at its peak brightness on April 29th 2017 (8 Tz’i) and reached its greatest height (western elongation) on June 3rd 2017 (4 Kan), which could be seen as the height of its influence.

It is said that the light of the morning star illuminates that which has been hidden, it is an exposer of cover-ups, particularly those of a sexual nature. Additionally it is said that when Venus rises heliacally on a K’at day, the Venus deities spear  the old men, the rulers and kings. Has this morning star period seen older men in powerful positions falling from grace due to sex scandals?

On the day 10 Ajpu (25th November 2017), according to the Dresden codex, Venus will cease to be a feature in our morning sky. The morning star will disappear to the underworld, only to reappear as the evening star on 9 Tz’i Kame, 23rd February 2018.

This is a time that could be seen as a respite from the disturbing influence that Venus has. It can be a time to look at what went wrong and see how to avoid making the same mistakes in the future. It is a time to evaluate ourselves, and the leaders of our society, a time to address our values and the values of the society we live in, and a time to redress the balance.

The phases of Venus 2017/2018, Starting at the inferior conjunction on 13 Ajmak (26th March 2017). By Mark Elmy

5 Tijax (8th November 2016)

5 TijaxTijax days can be very dualistic, representing both days of conflict and division, and days of healing and unification. Today we see this energy combined with the number 5 suggesting that either option may be hard work.

The energy of the nawal Tijax gives rise to a day of decisive action, where the obsidian blade is wielded in the hand. Herein lies a problem. This blade is double edged, and just as one side brings healing, the other brings war. Tijax has an argumentative side and today could be a day when its quarrelsome nature may emerge, particularly regarding work.If you decide to set your mind on achieving something today, the chances are that you will succeed in your quest. Just remember that this sharp blade lends itself to a sharp tongue too. By using the discerning nature of Tijax, you can ensure that you pick your targets carefully to avoid collateral damage. Your goal is to bring the divine to the world, and this does not have to involve a trail of destruction.

The day 5 Tijax can be see in its best aspect as a day of healing work. Whereas all Tijax days are known for healing, this is particularly the day on which it is time to get down to business, time to focus on removing the diseased or unbalanced. Likewise, any work to bring divinity or beauty into the world today may bring a beneficial outcome.

Sacrificial Death God 1The nawal Tijax is often thought of as an obsidian blade or knife. How the blade is used depends on the intention of the person wielding it. It can be wielded by a warrior or by a surgeon. These would seem like opposite ends of the spectrum, but where Tijax is concerned the aim is the same – healing.

Tijax is the nawal of the holy warrior. In the Mayan book of creation , the Popol Vuh, the first act of the hero twins was a mission given to them by the Heart of the Sky to rid the world of the false gods Seven Macaw, Zipacna and Earthquake. This is their quest, their crusade, and is represented by Tijax. They then sacrifice themselves in the underworld (Kame) and are resurrected with magical abilities (Ix). By destroying the false gods, the twins brought balance to the world, and helped mankind, they brought healing to the world. They cut out that which caused disease, exactly as a surgeon would do.

Tijax is celebrated as a day of healers, particularly what could be seen as the masculine aspect of healing. It is a day of crusading, of standing up for what is right. It has a tenacity to it, it is sometimes belligerent, it will not be stopped in its quest. It is the healer who refuses to give up on finding a cure. Tijax gives powers of discernment and refinement. Just as the surgeons scalpel cuts away disease and the warriors blade dispatches the evil, the sculptors chisel creates beauty by remodelling the base material. It is a day of alchemy, both internal and external, turning the ordinary into the divine.

The Sacred Mayan calendar is often said to be a calendar of human life, and parts of it can be seen as a microcosm of the human body. The number five is one of these parts. It is representative of the hand with it’s five digits. It is with our hands that we work, and with what we earn for that work that we pay our debts. Five is also a number that relates to the sacred fire where we pay our debts with offerings and prayers. Five might be so busy working that it fails to remember what it is working for. It can also signify that what it is attached to becomes work, or is “hard work”.