Tag Archives: Conception

5 Aq’ab’al (29th September 2017)

5 Aq'ab'alA little hard work can really get things moving today. The energy of today suggests that putting some extra effort into a new project will pay off, but it might be a little more work than you expected.

When you dream of a new idea or a solution to a problem, you might dream of the final result or outcome rather than all the detailed steps. You wake with the idea in your head as to the direction to move in, but then you have to work out the preliminary moves. This is where Aq´ab´al comes in helping to turn the dream into a concept you can begin to ground into reality. Aq´ab´al gives you the light at the end of the tunnel, without all the steps in the tunnel. You know now that the dawn, the new light is definitely coming, you just have to figure out your way to get to it. Today, the light is not coming to you, if you want to experience it you have to put in the energy or work to get to it.

The energy of this day is the energy of the project initiator, pulling together all the essential elements into the right place, at the right time, to move towards the goal. It provides drive and determination to achieve the dream, although sometimes the work put in may be at the detriment of other relationships. Sometimes the concept looks straightforward, but when you start work you realise it will take more effort than you originally planned. You might find yourself so absorbed into a new project that you forget what else is going on around you, or end up working later than usual. That is not to say that the work will not be rewarding, just that imbalance may occur.

In the process of moving into the new life, your rebirth through the Kawok trecena, things are really moving now. Your passage towards the light is continuing, your emergence into your new world. Today we have the energy to push hard into the new concept of ourselves we wish to become.

Equally, with regards to relationships, which are also highlighted by Aq´ab´al, today might well be a day where some extra effort put into your relationship may really prove beneficial. If you are looking to initiate a relationship, today may prove conducive, although it might require more energy than you anticipated.

Dawn over Lake Atitlan, 21st February 2016, as seen from the garden of Flower House, San Pablo La Laguna. Picture by Mark Elmy

In the Kiche language, the word aq’ab means night. The suffix -al changes the meaning slightly, to hint at change and alludes to the dawning of the day, the time between darkness and light, night and day. Just as birth is the beginning of the mortal journey, Aq’ab’al is the beginning of the day, although the detail of the day may still be obscured. Aq’ab’al is representative of new things, things which are not yet fully formed. While in Santiago Atitlan one day, a friend explained to me the different parts of a weaving in process on a backstrap loom. Aq’ab’al is the warp (the vertical threads), B’atz is the weft (the horizontal threads) which creates the whole cloth, and the newly woven cloth is Kawok. In order for the weaver to create, first she has an idea in her head or a dream. She sets out the dream on her loom by setting up the warp. Thus, the design has passed from being just an idea, to the beginnings of a woven reality, although it still requires creative input before it becomes whole. Aq’ab’al can also represent conception, the fertilised egg is far from ready to be born, but has passed from the dream or spirit world into the physical.

Aq’ab’al days are great days for the start of new things, particularly new relationships – Aq’ab’al has a strong affinity with marriage. It is also a perfect day for starting new projects, or at least bringing them into the world of light from the world of dreams and ideas.

The Sacred Mayan calendar is often said to be a calendar of human life, and parts of it can be seen as a microcosm of the human body. The number five is one of these parts. It is representative of the hand with it’s five digits. It is with our hands that we work, and with what we earn for that work that we pay our debts. Five is also a number that relates to the sacred fire where we pay our debts with offerings and prayers. Five might be so busy working that it fails to remember what it is working for. It can also signify that what it is attached to becomes work, or is “hard work”.

4 Aq’ab’al (20th August 2017)

4 Aq'ab'alAfter the possible turbulence of the day 3 Iq’, comes a day where is is really possible to bring things together. 4 Aq’ab’al is a wonderful day to start a new project, to ground a dream into physical reality.

Whilst the full light of the new day is still shrouded in darkness, the clarity of dawn has arrived. Of course, we don’t know yet exactly how the day will pan out, but we can see a clear sky and we have the potential for a beautiful day.

If there is something you have been dreaming of for a while, or something you are inspired to do, today is the day to start to create a concept from the dream. It may not necessarily be the emergence of the concept into the real world just yet, it still needs to gestate. It could be that you were dreaming about making a journey, if so, today is the day to book the tickets. In one sense, you have begun the journey, you have moved it into the physical, yet you have not taken a first step yet. Booking the tickets for the journey is one metaphor we can use to describe the essence of this day, but we can apply this idea in many ways. It is a day to make the preliminary sketches for your masterpiece, or to write up your business plan. Romantically, it is also a great day pluck up the courage to make that first date! It is a day where you can begin to bring stability to the new light you can bring to your life and to the world.

Dawn over Lake Atitlan, 21st February 2016, as seen from the garden of Flower House, San Pablo La Laguna. Picture by Mark Elmy
Dawn over Lake Atitlan, 21st February 2016, as seen from the garden of Flower House, San Pablo La Laguna. Picture by Mark Elmy

In the K’iche language, the word aq’ab means night. The suffix -al changes the meaning slightly, to hint at change and alludes to the dawning of the day, the time between darkness and light, night and day. Just as birth is the beginning of the mortal journey, Aq’ab’al is the beginning of the day, although the detail of the day may still be obscured. Aq’ab’al is representative of new things, things which are not yet fully formed. While in Santiago Atitlan one day, a friend explained to me the different parts of a weaving in process on a backstrap loom. Aq’ab’al is the warp (the vertical threads), B’atz is the weft (the horizontal threads) which creates the whole cloth, and the newly woven cloth is Kawok. In order for the weaver to create, first she has an idea in her head or a dream. She sets out the dream on her loom by setting up the warp. Thus, the design has passed from being just an idea, to the beginnings of a woven reality, although it still requires creative input before it becomes whole. Aq’ab’al can also represent conception, the fertilised egg is far from ready to be born, but has passed from the dream or spirit world into the physical.

Aq’ab’al days are great days for the start of new things, particularly new relationships – Aq’ab’al has a strong affinity with marriage. It is also a perfect day for starting new projects, or at least bringing them into the world of light from the world of dreams and ideas.

The number 4 is very important within Mayan mythology. Four represents the cardinal points, the four colours of maize, the four carriers of the year, the two equinoxes and two solstices, as well as midnight, sunrise, midday and sunset. The number four is representative of the four first men, who raised the sky from the sea to create the world we live on. In Mayan myth it is four pillars that support the sky from the Earth. As you can imagine, four is a number which represents stability, a solar number. Even though it is still low, it is thought of as a good number.

3 Aq’ab’al (11th July 2017)

3 Aq'ab'alWhilst Aq’ab’al days are often great days to start new projects, the energy of the 3 may make this one rather more challenging. Today, the dawning may be more of an internal realisation than external process.

When a newborn enters the world, the first few days must be rather confusing. As I have mentioned before, it could be said that we have just entered a new cycle of the Mayan Sacred Calendar, the Chol Q’ij. Whether we take this to be the full new 260 day count, or solely the new 13 day count (trecena) is unimportant, the outcome is more or less the same. With 1 Imox, we had the jumbled fragments of the big dream, full of potential, but uncertain due to its novelty. 2 Iq’ brought us an as yet uncertain message that could go either way, the wind that breathes life into the potential. In 3 Aq’ab’al, we see the first results of the energies of the previous two days. This could be a new conception, or something that fails to take root. There are too many uncertainties to be sure of the outcome.

Whilst Aq’ab’al is usually considered a “good” day, a day of new starts, of conception, the number 3 rather mutes these qualities. A possible phrase to associate with this day could be “false dawn”. You may think you can see the first light of the sun, but it may turn out to be a mirage, or just the light of Venus. This is a day when things might not quite be what they seem. If you are waiting to start something, it is not quite the time. You might be all ready and raring to go, only to be confronted by an unexpected challenge. Proceed with caution, or wait for a more conducive day.

On a more positive note, the 3 could represent the home. In order to direct your energy in a more constructive way, planning a new project around your home may be the most beneficial way to spend the day. Look for the new light inside of yourself. This is, after all, what could be considered to be the dawn of creation.

A False Dawn? Moonrise over Lake Atitlan, March 2013 - by Mark Elmy
A False Dawn? Moonrise over Lake Atitlan, March 2013 – by Mark Elmy

In the  K’iche language, the word aq’ab means night. The suffix -al changes the meaning slightly, to hint at change and alludes to the dawning of the day, the time between darkness and light, night and day. Just as birth is the beginning of the mortal journey, Aq’ab’al is the beginning of the day, although the detail of the day may still be obscured. Aq’ab’al is representative of new things, things which are not yet fully formed. While in Santiago Atitlan one day, a friend explained to me the different parts of a weaving in process on a backstrap loom. Aq’ab’al is the warp (the vertical threads), B’atz is the weft (the horizontal threads) which creates the whole cloth, and the newly woven cloth is Kawok. In order for the weaver to create, first she has an idea in her head or a dream. She sets out the dream on her loom by setting up the warp. Thus, the design has passed from being just an idea, to the beginnings of a woven reality, although it still requires creative input before it becomes whole. Aq’ab’al can also represent conception, the fertilised egg is far from ready to be born, but has passed from the dream or spirit world into the physical.

Aq’ab’al days are great days for the start of new things, particularly new relationships – Aq’ab’al has a strong affinity with marriage. It is also a perfect day for starting new projects, or at least bringing them into the world of light from the world of dreams and ideas.

There are various myths about the creation which link with the number 3. One is that at the time of creation, three stone jumped out of the fireplace and formed the new world. These three stones are called the hearthstones, and are still seen in many Maya homes today, on the fire supporting the tortilla griddle. From an astronomical point of view, the stones are the stars Alnitak, Saiph and Rigel in the constellation we call Orion, and the Smoky Fireplace is the Great Orion Nebula (M42)

A (slightly crude) montage showing a proposed correlation between the constellation of Orion and the triadic structure of Maya pyramids. This one is "El Tigre" at the El Mirador site. Photo and montage by Mark Elmy
A (slightly crude) montage showing a proposed correlation between the constellation of Orion and the triadic structure of Maya pyramids. This one is “El Tigre” at the El Mirador site. Photo and montage by Mark Elmy

The number 3 is still in the low end of the range of numbers. It does not have much energy yet, and it is also an odd number. It can represent the home, relating to the three hearthstones laid by the creators, and this is probably a good focus for a 3 day. However, it is possibly the most troublesome of the numbers to deal with, it lacks stability and represents challenges and obstructions. The number three brings up internal/external dilemma. The lack of stability in the physical, external world that it brings suggests that the more appropriate action is to look to the internal world, both of the home and of yourself.

2 Aq’ab’al (1st June 2017)

2 Aq'ab'alThe day 2 Aq’ab’al can show you the positive and negative aspects of a potential new endeavour, its strengths and weaknesses.It is a day to bring your dreams closer to reality, particularly if they relate to a relationship. 

Aq’ab’al days are said to be representative of relationships and marriage. Perhaps this is because they are the bridge between the polarities, night and the day, the dream world and the physical world. They are the conception days, days of new life when new ideas are conceived, and these ideas, like children from our marriages, become our legacy, our immortality. Aq’ab’al acts as a bridge between polarities, including the logical and artistic, which can give rise to great creativity. As we see in the Maya cross, Aq’ab’al evolves to B’atz, the creative genius.

Today this natural tendency is amplified by the energy of the number 2, which also relates to polarities. This could give rise to a day when polarities are emphasised, where the differences are particularly highlighted and become as clear as night or day. This may lead to some rather stark truths becoming very obvious, yet possibly the Aq’ab’al energy is the one which helps us to understand how to join two polarities, how to marry them together to create a bright future. Another quality of the number 2 is that of self sacrifice, which suggests that in order to create this union, a little sacrifice may be required on each side.

Dawn over Lake Atitlan, 21st February 2016, as seen from the garden of Flower House, San Pablo La Laguna. Picture by Mark Elmy
Dawn over Lake Atitlan, 21st February 2016, as seen from the garden of Flower House, San Pablo La Laguna. Picture by Mark Elmy

In the Kiche language, the word aq’ab means night. The suffix -al changes the meaning slightly, to hint at change and alludes to the dawning of the day, the time between darkness and light, night and day. Just as birth is the beginning of the mortal journey, Aq’ab’al is the beginning of the day, although the detail of the day may still be obscured. Aq’ab’al is representative of new things, things which are not yet fully formed. While in Santiago Atitlan one day, a friend explained to me the different parts of a weaving in process on a backstrap loom. Aq’ab’al is the warp (the vertical threads), B’atz is the weft (the horizontal threads) which creates the whole cloth, and the newly woven cloth is Kawok. In order for the weaver to create, first she has an idea in her head or a dream. She sets out the dream on her loom by setting up the warp. Thus, the design has passed from being just an idea, to the beginnings of a woven reality, although it still requires creative input before it becomes whole. Aq’ab’al can also represent conception, the fertilised egg is far from ready to be born, but has passed from the dream or spirit world into the physical.

Aq’ab’al days are great days for the start of new things, particularly new relationships – Aq’ab’al has a strong affinity with marriage. It is also a perfect day for starting new projects, or at least bringing them into the world of light from the world of dreams and ideas.

The number 2 is representative of duality, of polarity. Although it is a low number it has surprising strength as it is said to be able to call upon both aspects or polarities of what it is attached to. It is said to be the number of lovers, it signifies relationships and self-sacrifice. Whilst it can lend itself to mediation, seeing both sides of the story, it also can be indecisive.

8 Aq’ab’al (12th May 2017)

8 Aq'ab'alNew beginnings and old concepts combine to strengthen each other and bring their fullest expression. This is a day to celebrate a new dawn, new life coming to the world.

The day Aq’ab’al is a day to celebrate our ability to conceive our dreams into reality. It is a day on which we can embrace novelty for everything it brings to us.

Today it is associated with the energy of the number 8, representing totality. It represents the new birth of the 1 and the finality of the 7 in one place, together. We can see it as representing the very new and the very old, the first hint of the new day, and the fully risen sun together.

Our new concepts and ideas are what keep the new life coming to our world. We are here to progress, to advance, and to evolve. However, in order to truly do this, we advance ancient concepts by revitalising them rather than forgetting them. We can incorporate old concepts into our brand new ideas, bringing out the best of both worlds.

This is a day to really flesh out our ideas, to see them in totality so that we can understand how to further nourish them in order to bring them into this world. We might find that nourishment in ancient concepts.


In the Kiche language, the word aq’ab means night. The suffix -al changes the meaning slightly, to hint at change and alludes to the dawning of the day, the time between darkness and light, night and day. Just as birth is the beginning of the mortal journey, Aq’ab’al is the beginning of the day, although the detail of the day may still be obscured. Aq’ab’al is representative of new things, things which are not yet fully formed. While in Santiago Atitlan one day, a friend explained to me the different parts of a weaving in process on a backstrap loom. Aq’ab’al is the warp (the vertical threads), B’atz is the weft (the horizontal threads) which creates the whole cloth, and the newly woven cloth is Kawok. In order for the weaver to create, first she has an idea in her head or a dream. She sets out the dream on her loom by setting up the warp. Thus, the design has passed from being just an idea, to the beginnings of a woven reality, although it still requires creative input before it becomes whole. Aq’ab’al can also represent conception, the fertilised egg is far from ready to be born, but has passed from the dream or spirit world into the physical.

Aq’ab’al days are great days for the start of new things, particularly new relationships – Aq’ab’al has a strong affinity with marriage. It is also a perfect day for starting new projects, or at least bringing them into the world of light from the world of dreams and ideas.

The number 8 is considered to be a number of wholeness. It can be seen as birth (1) and death (7) combined to represent the whole cycle of the soul. It can also be seen as the point where the four first men who raised the sky from the sea were joined by their wives and the world become whole. It is the most common day for ceremonies to be made, it is still in the balanced range of numbers and is an even number, which is also considered fortunate. As this wholeness represents every aspect of the energy of the day with which it is coupled, it is the wholeness of the nawal that is addressed in ceremony.

1 Aq’ab’al (22nd April 2017)

1 AqabalThe energy of the number 1, of novelty and birth, combines with the nawal of the new conception today, providing an excellent day to start a new project or phase of life.

When we consider the nawal Aq’ab’al as the dawning of the new day, the energy of 1 Aq’ab’al can be seen as the very first moment of realisation that a new day is coming. It is far from light, in fact it is only just distinguishable. Somewhere in the darkness, light begins to make its presence known. This is the beginning of beginnings, it is the first spark of the fire. The first spark needs tending, gentle use of breath and material in order to grow it into the fire it will become.

The spark may represent a new idea that you have, but this is the first thought of this idea. It is something that comes in the waking moment, fresh from the dream world. It has started to emerge into this world, but is still uncertain, hidden and yet to take much form. This is the moment where it needs support and tending, just as the spark, or the newborn needs care and attention. This is where the input and encouragement of family, friends and community can help that spark to become the fire, or that newborn to grow.

Aq’ab’al can also represent relationships, so this day may be the first glimmer of something new, or the rekindling of an existing relationship in order to start a new “day.” Either way, this should be a rather joyful day of new possibilities.

The day 1 Aq’ab’al is an excellent day for starting new ventures, for getting your ideas out into the world and for receiving the encouragement we need for new projects.


In the Kiche language, the word aq’ab means night. The suffix -al changes the meaning slightly, to hint at change and alludes to the dawning of the day, the time between darkness and light, night and day. Just as birth is the beginning of the mortal journey, Aq’ab’al is the beginning of the day, although the detail of the day may still be obscured. Aq’ab’al is representative of new things, things which are not yet fully formed. While in Santiago Atitlan one day, a friend explained to me the different parts of a weaving in process on a backstrap loom. Aq’ab’al is the warp (the vertical threads), B’atz is the weft (the horizontal threads) which creates the whole cloth, and the newly woven cloth is Kawok. In order for the weaver to create, first she has an idea in her head or a dream. She sets out the dream on her loom by setting up the warp. Thus, the design has passed from being just an idea, to the beginnings of a woven reality, although it still requires creative input before it becomes whole. Aq’ab’al can also represent conception, the fertilised egg is far from ready to be born, but has passed from the dream or spirit world into the physical.

Aq’ab’al days are great days for the start of new things, particularly new relationships – Aq’ab’al has a strong affinity with marriage. It is also a perfect day for starting new projects, or at least bringing them into the world of light from the world of dreams and ideas.

The number 1 is representative of the seed, of unity. It represents birth and beginnings. It is a low and odd number, which usually represents something challenging. However, the seed can grow into a mighty tree, it is full of potential. It just needs the correct nutrients and conditions to germinate and develop, just as sometimes we need encouragement to develop our ideas.

13 Aq’ab’al (13th March 2017)

13 Aq'ab'alWe are already in the 20 day count down towards the day 8 B’atz, one of the most important days in the sacred calendar. 13 Aq’ab’al features very strongly in this period.

In the “Maya Cross” form of astrology, one of the positions represents conception. This is a day 8 days (or 268 days) before the birth date. Today, the day 13 Aq’ab’al represents the conception day of 8 B’atz, the reweaving of the world through the joining of the old fabric with the new.

Aq’ab’al represents conception in itself. It is a joyful day when new concepts are proposed for creation into the physical world. In this way, Aq’ab’al acts as a bridge between the dreaming potential of all that is, which we see in the nawal Imox, and the physical world. It has moved into our physical reality, but it is hidden within the mother. In some senses it is between the worlds, we cannot see it in its own right but we know it is there, we know the new life is on its way.

The number 13, of course, represents the world of the ancestors, the spirit world. When we combine this with the nawal Aq’ab’al we can begin to understand just how auspicious this day could be.

13 Aq’ab’al is the new conception into this world from the spirit world. It represents the passing of the wisdom and knowledge from the ancestors into our new world. It gives us the pattern for the joining of the old world with the new.  This is a potent day to revisit ancestral teachings and understandings, to bring them into modern life.


In the Kiche language, the word aq’ab means night. The suffix -al changes the meaning slightly, to hint at change and alludes to the dawning of the day, the time between darkness and light, night and day. Just as birth is the beginning of the mortal journey, Aq’ab’al is the beginning of the day, although the detail of the day may still be obscured. Aq’ab’al is representative of new things, things which are not yet fully formed. While in Santiago Atitlan one day, a friend explained to me the different parts of a weaving in process on a backstrap loom. Aq’ab’al is the warp (the vertical threads), B’atz is the weft (the horizontal threads) which creates the whole cloth, and the newly woven cloth is Kawok. In order for the weaver to create, first she has an idea in her head or a dream. She sets out the dream on her loom by setting up the warp. Thus, the design has passed from being just an idea, to the beginnings of a woven reality, although it still requires creative input before it becomes whole. Aq’ab’al can also represent conception, the fertilised egg is far from ready to be born, but has passed from the dream or spirit world into the physical.

Aq’ab’al days are great days for the start of new things, particularly new relationships – Aq’ab’al has a strong affinity with marriage. It is also a perfect day for starting new projects, or at least bringing them into the world of light from the world of dreams and ideas.

The number 13 is the final number on the pyramid. It represents the spirit world. It is said that on Halloween, the veil between the worlds is the thinnest. However within the sacred calendar, this thinning happens every 13 days. This connection with the spirit world creates a powerful day, where both the positive and negative aspects of the nawal it is attached to come through strongly. It is a very good day for activities such as divination, however, ceremonies on 13 days are generally only carried out by the most experienced Aj Q’ij who understand how to work with that strength of energy.

5 Aq’ab’al (12th January 2017)

5 Aq'ab'alA little hard work can really get things moving today. The energy of today suggests that putting some extra effort into a new project will pay off, but it might be a little more work than you expected.

When you dream of a new idea or a solution to a problem, you might dream of the final result or outcome rather than all the detailed steps. You wake with the idea in your head as to the direction to move in, but then you have to work out the preliminary moves. This is where Aq´ab´al comes in helping to turn the dream into a concept you can begin to ground into reality. Aq´ab´al gives you the light at the end of the tunnel, without all the steps in the tunnel. You know now that the dawn, the new light is definitely coming, you just have to figure out your way to get to it. Today, the light is not coming to you, if you want to experience it you have to put in the energy or work to get to it.

The energy of this day is the energy of the project initiator, pulling together all the essential elements into the right place, at the right time, to move towards the goal. It provides drive and determination to achieve the dream, although sometimes the work put in may be at the detriment of other relationships. Sometimes the concept looks straightforward, but when you start work you realise it will take more effort than you originally planned. You might find yourself so absorbed into a new project that you forget what else is going on around you, or end up working later than usual. That is not to say that the work will not be rewarding, just that imbalance may occur.

In the process of moving into the new life, your rebirth through the Kawok trecena, things are really moving now. Your passage towards the light is continuing, your emergence into your new world. Today we have the energy to push hard into the new concept of ourselves we wish to become.

Equally, with regards to relationships, which are also highlighted by Aq´ab´al, today might well be a day where some extra effort put into your relationship may really prove beneficial. If you are looking to initiate a relationship, today may prove conducive, although it might require more energy than you anticipated.

Dawn over Lake Atitlan, 21st February 2016, as seen from the garden of Flower House, San Pablo La Laguna. Picture by Mark Elmy

In the Kiche language, the word aq’ab means night. The suffix -al changes the meaning slightly, to hint at change and alludes to the dawning of the day, the time between darkness and light, night and day. Just as birth is the beginning of the mortal journey, Aq’ab’al is the beginning of the day, although the detail of the day may still be obscured. Aq’ab’al is representative of new things, things which are not yet fully formed. While in Santiago Atitlan one day, a friend explained to me the different parts of a weaving in process on a backstrap loom. Aq’ab’al is the warp (the vertical threads), B’atz is the weft (the horizontal threads) which creates the whole cloth, and the newly woven cloth is Kawok. In order for the weaver to create, first she has an idea in her head or a dream. She sets out the dream on her loom by setting up the warp. Thus, the design has passed from being just an idea, to the beginnings of a woven reality, although it still requires creative input before it becomes whole. Aq’ab’al can also represent conception, the fertilised egg is far from ready to be born, but has passed from the dream or spirit world into the physical.

Aq’ab’al days are great days for the start of new things, particularly new relationships – Aq’ab’al has a strong affinity with marriage. It is also a perfect day for starting new projects, or at least bringing them into the world of light from the world of dreams and ideas.

The Sacred Mayan calendar is often said to be a calendar of human life, and parts of it can be seen as a microcosm of the human body. The number five is one of these parts. It is representative of the hand with it’s five digits. It is with our hands that we work, and with what we earn for that work that we pay our debts. Five is also a number that relates to the sacred fire where we pay our debts with offerings and prayers. Five might be so busy working that it fails to remember what it is working for. It can also signify that what it is attached to becomes work, or is “hard work”.

4 Aq’ab’al (3rd December 2016)

4 Aq'ab'alAfter the possible turbulence of the day 3 Iq’, comes a day where is is really possible to bring things together. 4 Aq’ab’al is a wonderful day to start a new project, to ground a dream into physical reality.

Whilst the full light of the new day is still shrouded in darkness, the clarity of dawn has arrived. Of course, we don’t know yet exactly how the day will pan out, but we can see a clear sky and we have the potential for a beautiful day.

If there is something you have been dreaming of for a while, or something you are inspired to do, today is the day to start to create a concept from the dream. It may not necessarily be the emergence of the concept into the real world just yet, it still needs to gestate. It could be that you were dreaming about making a journey, if so, today is the day to book the tickets. In one sense, you have begun the journey, you have moved it into the physical, yet you have not taken a first step yet. Booking the tickets for the journey is one metaphor we can use to describe the essence of this day, but we can apply this idea in many ways. It is a day to make the preliminary sketches for your masterpiece, or to write up your business plan. Romantically, it is also a great day pluck up the courage to make that first date! It is a day where you can begin to bring stability to the new light you can bring to your life and to the world.

Dawn over Lake Atitlan, 21st February 2016, as seen from the garden of Flower House, San Pablo La Laguna. Picture by Mark Elmy
Dawn over Lake Atitlan, 21st February 2016, as seen from the garden of Flower House, San Pablo La Laguna. Picture by Mark Elmy

In the K’iche language, the word aq’ab means night. The suffix -al changes the meaning slightly, to hint at change and alludes to the dawning of the day, the time between darkness and light, night and day. Just as birth is the beginning of the mortal journey, Aq’ab’al is the beginning of the day, although the detail of the day may still be obscured. Aq’ab’al is representative of new things, things which are not yet fully formed. While in Santiago Atitlan one day, a friend explained to me the different parts of a weaving in process on a backstrap loom. Aq’ab’al is the warp (the vertical threads), B’atz is the weft (the horizontal threads) which creates the whole cloth, and the newly woven cloth is Kawok. In order for the weaver to create, first she has an idea in her head or a dream. She sets out the dream on her loom by setting up the warp. Thus, the design has passed from being just an idea, to the beginnings of a woven reality, although it still requires creative input before it becomes whole. Aq’ab’al can also represent conception, the fertilised egg is far from ready to be born, but has passed from the dream or spirit world into the physical.

Aq’ab’al days are great days for the start of new things, particularly new relationships – Aq’ab’al has a strong affinity with marriage. It is also a perfect day for starting new projects, or at least bringing them into the world of light from the world of dreams and ideas.

The number 4 is very important within Mayan mythology. Four represents the cardinal points, the four colours of maize, the four carriers of the year, the two equinoxes and two solstices, as well as midnight, sunrise, midday and sunset. The number four is representative of the four first men, who raised the sky from the sea to create the world we live on. In Mayan myth it is four pillars that support the sky from the Earth. As you can imagine, four is a number which represents stability, a solar number. Even though it is still low, it is thought of as a good number.