Tag Archives: Rebirth

8 Kame (19th June 2018)

8 KameThe number 8 can be seen to represent birth (1) and death (7) brought together. Combined here with Kame, the nawal of transformation, this day strongly represents the turning of the wheel of life and the growth it creates.

As the days go, there can hardly be a more representative energy of the cycle of life and possibly the cycle of the soul. Today is a day that ceremonies will be made to honour our ancestors, those who are walking their path in the other world. It is said that after death, the souls pass into the underworld where they pass through the houses of challenges. Upon completion of the challenges, they then climb the world tree to the heavens, from where they again incarnate. Today we remember our ancestors, their love and what they brought to us. We are here because of them, we carry their DNA forwards. They taught us things both through their actions and their words. It is for all of these things that we thank our ancestors, we show our love, we show that they are remembered. We hold them in our hearts, and in our memories they live on. This is a day to embrace joy and allow Kame to burn away our grief.

When we see Kame in combination with the 8, this really brings home the wholeness of the cycle of life. It is not just the physical death of the body, every change we go through is a death or end of something. Even birth is the end of a cycle of gestation, the beginning of parenthood, the beginning of a new life. This is a day to celebrate those changes. It is a day when we embrace the changes which happen through the emergence of the new (1) and the death of the old (7) all together in one place. In this Kawok trecena, as we go through our own rebirth process, today is the changing point where we become that which our process has brought us to, we step through the veil into our new self.

The day 8 Kame is also seen as the perfect day to get married. When a couple are married, their lineages become entwined, woven together. This is obvious as their offspring will carry the DNA of both bloodlines. However, it is also seen as having an effect of bringing together the ancestors. The wishes of the ancestors are considered in a great many things and a marriage on a day which honours them is thought to be highly beneficial. The reason why the 8 Kame is particularly seen as beneficial is that not only is it a day on which the ancestors are honoured, it is a day which takes into consideration the four first couples  – Balam Kitze and Kaja Paluna; Balam Aq’ab and Chomija; Majujkutaj and Tz’unun Ya; Balam Ikim and Kakixaja. According to the creation stories, they are the ancestors of us all, the guardians of each of the cardinal points. They bless the union of the couple with the masculine and feminine aspects of the properties of each of the directions – strength, wisdom, spirit and abundance.

Materials for a wedding ceremony. A corn cob each of red, white, black and yellow, together with a bowl of water for each direction, bring a physical representation of the properties of the four first couples to the bride and groom. Photo by Hana Wolf

Kame relates to death, which often makes people nervous. However, this nawal is seen as an extremely positive day. Birth is the gateway into the mortal life, death the gateway into the eternal. In many shamanistic traditions, the initiate goes through several death experiences during training. This can be through the use of particular herbs, or sometimes through accident or illness. In these experiences the density of the mortal realm falls away and the greater understanding emerges. It can often be described as a spiritual transformation. In the Popul Vuh, the Mayan book of creation, the Hero Twins descend to the underworld, Xibalba, to confront the Lords of Death. They pass the many challenges set for them, but eventually end up being tricked by the Lord of Death. Instead of giving in, the Hero Twins choose to sacrifice themselves. They give instructions to a pair of seers to convince the Lords of Death to grind the Twins’ bones to dust and throw the dust in the river. Everything went according to plan and five days later the twins appeared as catfish in the river, then transformed into vagabond “magicians”. In this way we see a literal transformation from the crusader (Tijax) through death (Kame) to the higher self (Ix). This is the potential of the Kame day, to face ones fears and attain a higher perspective, to advance the journey of your soul. This is also a day to remember your ancestors and friends that have passed into the other realm, to remember what they taught you, and to thank them for their wisdom that helped you to grow.

The number 8 is considered to be a number of wholeness. It can be seen as birth (1) and death (7) combined to represent the whole cycle of the soul. It can also be seen as the point where the four first men who raised the sky from the sea were joined by their wives and the world become whole. It is the most common day for ceremonies to be made, it is still in the balanced range of numbers and is an even number, which is also considered fortunate. As this wholeness represents every aspect of the energy of the day with which it is coupled, it is the wholeness of the nawal that is addressed in ceremony.

1 Kawok (12th June 2018)

1 KawokWe have been through the inner alchemy, the transformation of the Kame trecena and now emerge fresh and newborn. The trecena of Kawok acts as the midwife assisting our birth into a new phase of life.

Chak sends the fire serpent (lightning) from the sky, from the Dresden Codex
Chak sends the fire serpent (lightning) from the sky, from the Dresden Codex

Today we begin our rebirth process. Kame changed us, with Tijax finally cutting away what was holding us back. Now Kawok is here to sooth us and to wash away any debris. The midwife aspect of the energy of the nawal Kawok gently guides us, helping us move through our rebirth process and into the world. The healing feminine energy of this day brings compassion to our process, and creates a graceful and beautiful experience of rebirth.

Both Kawok and 1 have strong connections with birth and new life. The number 1 representing potential may give rise to us needing a little assistance to realise the potential within our opportunity. We may be ready to grow and walk, but sometimes we need a little help to get on our feet as we take our first tottering steps. Kawok is there for us, ready to hold our hand, gently but firmly guiding us as we emerge into our new world. She is a representative of the healing woman and the wisdom of the grandmothers. Today we may choose to seek out those women who support us through our process of rebirth or re-invention. The compassion and wisdom shown to us by the women around us helps us to move forward into new areas.  This day is the very beginning of the new life, or a new direction, which has all the potential to be whatever we choose it to be.


Ixchel empties the water jar, washing away the old world in order to bring in the new. From the Dresden Codex
Ixchel empties the water jar, washing away the old world in order to bring in the new. From the Dresden Codex

Nawal Kawok is in some ways a counterpart to the nawal Tijax. Where Tijax has masculine aspects of healing, Kawok has the feminine aspect. Kawok is sometimes referred to as rain or storm. It is this rain that washes away that which has been cut out by Tijax.

While most healing roles within the Maya world do not seem to be gender specific, one is. Both women and men may be healers, prayer makers, herbalists and diviners, only women will become midwives. Kawok is the energy of the midwife. Kawok helps to clear the obstructions from the birth process, in some ways it actually represents the birth process. Kawok brings the new into the world. In the Mayan cross, Kawok, the birth process finishes the sequence which starts with Aq’ab’al (conception) and moves through B’atz (gestation.) In the sequence of the calendar, Kawok precedes Ajpu. Ajpu represents the resurrection of the maize lord, also the creation of the world. Kawok creates the conditions for that to happen, the rain which brings forth the sprouting of the maize.

In its storm aspect, Kawok can be destructive, although it is a destruction which allows a new creation to happen. Kawok energy can give rise to some tempestuous situations, it can be a day which can give people a rough ride, although this may be for the eventual good. It is a day to ask for the gentle rain to bless your crops, and for the harsh rain to stop. It is a day which washes away the old and outworn in life, so that the new growth, life and divinity may emerge.

The number 1 is representative of the seed, of unity. It represents birth and beginnings. It is a low and odd number, which usually represents something challenging. However, the seed can grow into a mighty tree, it is full of potential. It just needs the correct nutrients and conditions to germinate and develop, just as sometimes we need encouragement to develop our ideas.

8 Kame (2nd October 2017)

8 KameThe number 8 can be seen to represent birth (1) and death (7) brought together. Combined here with Kame, the nawal of transformation, this day strongly represents the turning of the wheel of life and the growth it creates.

As the days go, there can hardly be a more representative energy of the cycle of life and possibly the cycle of the soul. Today is a day that ceremonies will be made to honour our ancestors, those who are walking their path in the other world. It is said that after death, the souls pass into the underworld where they pass through the houses of challenges. Upon completion of the challenges, they then climb the world tree to the heavens, from where they again incarnate. Today we remember our ancestors, their love and what they brought to us. We are here because of them, we carry their DNA forwards. They taught us things both through their actions and their words. It is for all of these things that we thank our ancestors, we show our love, we show that they are remembered. We hold them in our hearts, and in our memories they live on. This is a day to embrace joy and allow Kame to burn away our grief.

When we see Kame in combination with the 8, this really brings home the wholeness of the cycle of life. It is not just the physical death of the body, every change we go through is a death or end of something. Even birth is the end of a cycle of gestation, the beginning of parenthood, the beginning of a new life. This is a day to celebrate those changes. It is a day when we embrace the changes which happen through the emergence of the new (1) and the death of the old (7) all together in one place. In this Kawok trecena, as we go through our own rebirth process, today is the changing point where we become that which our process has brought us to, we step through the veil into our new self.

The day 8 Kame is also seen as the perfect day to get married. When a couple are married, their lineages become entwined, woven together. This is obvious as their offspring will carry the DNA of both bloodlines. However, it is also seen as having an effect of bringing together the ancestors. The wishes of the ancestors are considered in a great many things and a marriage on a day which honours them is thought to be highly beneficial. The reason why the 8 Kame is particularly seen as beneficial is that not only is it a day on which the ancestors are honoured, it is a day which takes into consideration the four first couples  – Balam Kitze and Kaja Paluna; Balam Aq’ab and Chomija; Majujkutaj and Tz’unun Ya; Balam Ikim and Kakixaja. According to the creation stories, they are the ancestors of us all, the guardians of each of the cardinal points. They bless the union of the couple with the masculine and feminine aspects of the properties of each of the directions – strength, wisdom, spirit and abundance.

Materials for a wedding ceremony. A corn cob each of red, white, black and yellow, together with a bowl of water for each direction, bring a physical representation of the properties of the four first couples to the bride and groom. Photo by Hana Wolf

Kame relates to death, which often makes people nervous. However, this nawal is seen as an extremely positive day. Birth is the gateway into the mortal life, death the gateway into the eternal. In many shamanistic traditions, the initiate goes through several death experiences during training. This can be through the use of particular herbs, or sometimes through accident or illness. In these experiences the density of the mortal realm falls away and the greater understanding emerges. It can often be described as a spiritual transformation. In the Popul Vuh, the Mayan book of creation, the Hero Twins descend to the underworld, Xibalba, to confront the Lords of Death. They pass the many challenges set for them, but eventually end up being tricked by the Lord of Death. Instead of giving in, the Hero Twins choose to sacrifice themselves. They give instructions to a pair of seers to convince the Lords of Death to grind the Twins’ bones to dust and throw the dust in the river. Everything went according to plan and five days later the twins appeared as catfish in the river, then transformed into vagabond “magicians”. In this way we see a literal transformation from the crusader (Tijax) through death (Kame) to the higher self (Ix). This is the potential of the Kame day, to face ones fears and attain a higher perspective, to advance the journey of your soul. This is also a day to remember your ancestors and friends that have passed into the other realm, to remember what they taught you, and to thank them for their wisdom that helped you to grow.

The number 8 is considered to be a number of wholeness. It can be seen as birth (1) and death (7) combined to represent the whole cycle of the soul. It can also be seen as the point where the four first men who raised the sky from the sea were joined by their wives and the world become whole. It is the most common day for ceremonies to be made, it is still in the balanced range of numbers and is an even number, which is also considered fortunate. As this wholeness represents every aspect of the energy of the day with which it is coupled, it is the wholeness of the nawal that is addressed in ceremony.

1 Kawok (25th September 2017)

1 KawokWe have been through the inner alchemy, the transformation of the Kame trecena and now emerge fresh and newborn. The trecena of Kawok acts as the midwife assisting our birth into a new phase of life.

Chak sends the fire serpent (lightning) from the sky, from the Dresden Codex
Chak sends the fire serpent (lightning) from the sky, from the Dresden Codex

Today we begin our rebirth process. Kame changed us, with Tijax finally cutting away what was holding us back. Now Kawok is here to sooth us and to wash away any debris. The midwife aspect of the energy of the nawal Kawok gently guides us, helping us move through our rebirth process and into the world. The healing feminine energy of this day brings compassion to our process, and creates a graceful and beautiful experience of rebirth.

Both Kawok and 1 have strong connections with birth and new life. The number 1 representing potential may give rise to us needing a little assistance to realise the potential within our opportunity. We may be ready to grow and walk, but sometimes we need a little help to get on our feet as we take our first tottering steps. Kawok is there for us, ready to hold our hand, gently but firmly guiding us as we emerge into our new world. She is a representative of the healing woman and the wisdom of the grandmothers. Today we may choose to seek out those women who support us through our process of rebirth or re-invention. The compassion and wisdom shown to us by the women around us helps us to move forward into new areas.  This day is the very beginning of the new life, or a new direction, which has all the potential to be whatever we choose it to be.


Ixchel empties the water jar, washing away the old world in order to bring in the new. From the Dresden Codex
Ixchel empties the water jar, washing away the old world in order to bring in the new. From the Dresden Codex

Nawal Kawok is in some ways a counterpart to the nawal Tijax. Where Tijax has masculine aspects of healing, Kawok has the feminine aspect. Kawok is sometimes referred to as rain or storm. It is this rain that washes away that which has been cut out by Tijax.

While most healing roles within the Maya world do not seem to be gender specific, one is. Both women and men may be healers, prayer makers, herbalists and diviners, only women will become midwives. Kawok is the energy of the midwife. Kawok helps to clear the obstructions from the birth process, in some ways it actually represents the birth process. Kawok brings the new into the world. In the Mayan cross, Kawok, the birth process finishes the sequence which starts with Aq’ab’al (conception) and moves through B’atz (gestation.) In the sequence of the calendar, Kawok precedes Ajpu. Ajpu represents the resurrection of the maize lord, also the creation of the world. Kawok creates the conditions for that to happen, the rain which brings forth the sprouting of the maize.

In its storm aspect, Kawok can be destructive, although it is a destruction which allows a new creation to happen. Kawok energy can give rise to some tempestuous situations, it can be a day which can give people a rough ride, although this may be for the eventual good. It is a day to ask for the gentle rain to bless your crops, and for the harsh rain to stop. It is a day which washes away the old and outworn in life, so that the new growth, life and divinity may emerge.

The number 1 is representative of the seed, of unity. It represents birth and beginnings. It is a low and odd number, which usually represents something challenging. However, the seed can grow into a mighty tree, it is full of potential. It just needs the correct nutrients and conditions to germinate and develop, just as sometimes we need encouragement to develop our ideas.

8 Kame (15th January 2017)

8 KameThe number 8 can be seen to represent birth (1) and death (7) brought together. Combined here with Kame, the nawal of transformation, this day strongly represents the turning of the wheel of life and the growth it creates.

As the days go, there can hardly be a more representative energy of the cycle of life and possibly the cycle of the soul. Today is a day that ceremonies will be made to honour our ancestors, those who are walking their path in the other world. It is said that after death, the souls pass into the underworld where they pass through the houses of challenges. Upon completion of the challenges, they then climb the world tree to the heavens, from where they again incarnate. Today we remember our ancestors, their love and what they brought to us. We are here because of them, we carry their DNA forwards. They taught us things both through their actions and their words. It is for all of these things that we thank our ancestors, we show our love, we show that they are remembered. We hold them in our hearts, and in our memories they live on. This is a day to embrace joy and allow Kame to burn away our grief.

When we see Kame in combination with the 8, this really brings home the wholeness of the cycle of life. It is not just the physical death of the body, every change we go through is a death or end of something. Even birth is the end of a cycle of gestation, the beginning of parenthood, the beginning of a new life. This is a day to celebrate those changes. It is a day when we embrace the changes which happen through the emergence of the new (1) and the death of the old (7) all together in one place. In this Kawok trecena, as we go through our own rebirth process, today is the changing point where we become that which our process has brought us to, we step through the veil into our new self.

The day 8 Kame is also seen as the perfect day to get married. When a couple are married, their lineages become entwined, woven together. This is obvious as their offspring will carry the DNA of both bloodlines. However, it is also seen as having an effect of bringing together the ancestors. The wishes of the ancestors are considered in a great many things and a marriage on a day which honours them is thought to be highly beneficial. The reason why the 8 Kame is particularly seen as beneficial is that not only is it a day on which the ancestors are honoured, it is a day which takes into consideration the four first couples  – Balam Kitze and Kaja Paluma; Balam Aq’ab and Chomija; Majujkutaj and Tz’unun Ya; Balam Ikim and Kakixaja. According to the creation stories, they are the ancestors of us all, the guardians of each of the cardinal points. They bless the union of the couple with the masculine and feminine aspects of the properties of each of the directions – strength, wisdom, spirit and abundance.

Materials for a wedding ceremony. A corn cob each of red, white, black and yellow, together with a bowl of water for each direction bring a physical representation of the properties of the four first couples to the bride and groom. Photo by Nadia Petrova
Materials for a wedding ceremony. A corn cob each of red, white, black and yellow, together with a bowl of water for each direction, bring a physical representation of the properties of the four first couples to the bride and groom. Photo by Nadia Petrova

Kame relates to death, which often makes people nervous. However, this nawal is seen as an extremely positive day. Birth is the gateway into the mortal life, death the gateway into the eternal. In many shamanistic traditions, the initiate goes through several death experiences during training. This can be through the use of particular herbs, or sometimes through accident or illness. In these experiences the density of the mortal realm falls away and the greater understanding emerges. It can often be described as a spiritual transformation. In the Popul Vuh, the Mayan book of creation, the Hero Twins descend to the underworld, Xibalba, to confront the Lords of Death. They pass the many challenges set for them, but eventually end up being tricked by the Lord of Death. Instead of giving in, the Hero Twins choose to sacrifice themselves. They give instructions to a pair of seers to convince the Lords of Death to grind the Twins’ bones to dust and throw the dust in the river. Everything went according to plan and five days later the twins appeared as catfish in the river, then transformed into vagabond “magicians”. In this way we see a literal transformation from the crusader (Tijax) through death (Kame) to the higher self (Ix). This is the potential of the Kame day, to face ones fears and attain a higher perspective, to advance the journey of your soul. This is also a day to remember your ancestors and friends that have passed into the other realm, to remember what they taught you, and to thank them for their wisdom that helped you to grow.

The number 8 is considered to be a number of wholeness. It can be seen as birth (1) and death (7) combined to represent the whole cycle of the soul. It can also be seen as the point where the four first men who raised the sky from the sea were joined by their wives and the world become whole. It is the most common day for ceremonies to be made, it is still in the balanced range of numbers and is an even number, which is also considered fortunate. As this wholeness represents every aspect of the energy of the day with which it is coupled, it is the wholeness of the nawal that is addressed in ceremony.

1 Kawok (8th January 2017)

1 KawokWe have been through the inner alchemy, the transformation of the Kame trecena and now emerge fresh and newborn. The trecena of Kawok acts as the midwife assisting our birth into a new phase of life.

Chak sends the fire serpent (lightning) from the sky, from the Dresden Codex
Chak sends the fire serpent (lightning) from the sky, from the Dresden Codex

Today we begin our rebirth process. Kame changed us, with Tijax finally cutting away what was holding us back. Now Kawok is here to sooth us and to wash away any debris. The midwife aspect of the energy of the nawal Kawok gently guides us, helping us move through our rebirth process and into the world. The healing feminine energy of this day brings compassion to our process, and creates a graceful and beautiful experience of rebirth.

Both Kawok and 1 have strong connections with birth and new life. The number 1 representing potential may give rise to us needing a little assistance to realise the potential within our opportunity. We may be ready to grow and walk, but sometimes we need a little help to get on our feet as we take our first tottering steps. Kawok is there for us, ready to hold our hand, gently but firmly guiding us as we emerge into our new world. She is a representative of the healing woman and the wisdom of the grandmothers. Today we may choose to seek out those women who support us through our process of rebirth or re-invention. The compassion and wisdom shown to us by the women around us helps us to move forward into new areas.  This day is the very beginning of the new life, or a new direction, which has all the potential to be whatever we choose it to be.


Ixchel empties the water jar, washing away the old world in order to bring in the new. From the Dresden Codex
Ixchel empties the water jar, washing away the old world in order to bring in the new. From the Dresden Codex

Nawal Kawok is in some ways a counterpart to the nawal Tijax. Where Tijax has masculine aspects of healing, Kawok has the feminine aspect. Kawok is sometimes referred to as rain or storm. It is this rain that washes away that which has been cut out by Tijax.

While most healing roles within the Maya world do not seem to be gender specific, one is. Both women and men may be healers, prayer makers, herbalists and diviners, only women will become midwives. Kawok is the energy of the midwife. Kawok helps to clear the obstructions from the birth process, in some ways it actually represents the birth process. Kawok brings the new into the world. In the Mayan cross, Kawok, the birth process finishes the sequence which starts with Aq’ab’al (conception) and moves through B’atz (gestation.) In the sequence of the calendar, Kawok precedes Ajpu. Ajpu represents the resurrection of the maize lord, also the creation of the world. Kawok creates the conditions for that to happen, the rain which brings forth the sprouting of the maize.

In its storm aspect, Kawok can be destructive, although it is a destruction which allows a new creation to happen. Kawok energy can give rise to some tempestuous situations, it can be a day which can give people a rough ride, although this may be for the eventual good. It is a day to ask for the gentle rain to bless your crops, and for the harsh rain to stop. It is a day which washes away the old and outworn in life, so that the new growth, life and divinity may emerge.

The number 1 is representative of the seed, of unity. It represents birth and beginnings. It is a low and odd number, which usually represents something challenging. However, the seed can grow into a mighty tree, it is full of potential. It just needs the correct nutrients and conditions to germinate and develop, just as sometimes we need encouragement to develop our ideas.