6 Aj – 28th January 2016

6 AjAt the top of the sacred hill Paclom, in the centre of Momostenango, is a cross. Unlike many of the crosses you might see here, it has two cross pieces. I was told that reason for the  second bar was that it creates a two dimensional representation of the four directions. As such this cross represents the number 6, which is the other name for Paclom, the six place. For me this especially represents the power of the number six. It has the horizontal Earthly stability of the four cardinal points, yet is also vertically connected with the Heart of the Sky and the Heart of the Earth. Today on the day 6 Aj, we see that stability amplified. It is as if the vertical post, or spinal column, that would normally be found with any six day, is energised by the connection of Aj between the Sky and the Earth, the divine masculine and divine feminine essences.

And what is the point of this energisation? To bring this stability and blessing from the Celestial and Earthly realms into our world, our community and our families. This is a day on which to ask for, and give thanks for, stability in our homes and communities. It is a particular day on which we can call upon the “greater powers” to energise us, to give us strength, so that we may sustain those around us. If there was a day for a global meditation to bring peace and stability to the world, 6 Aj would make a prime candidate.

Paclom Cross by Mark Elmy

The nawal Aj is related to many things which generally revolve around leadership on an earthly level. It is sometimes known as the cornstalk, sometimes the staff of life. It represents the spinal column within the body, that which allows us to stand tall, proud and brave. As the cornstalk, it has its roots in the Earth, and its head in the sky. As we are the people of maize, if we wish to lead in a just manner, we should cultivate our connection with the Heart of the Sky and the Heart of the Earth.

Foliated crossThis is a picture of the carving at the top of one of my favourite Mayan temples, the Temple of the Foliated Cross on the site of Palenque (Bàakʼ) in Chiapas, Mexico. At the top of the tablet you see a bird, which represents the Heart of the Sky, the face with the large rectangular (crossed) eyes at the base of the cross represents the Heart of the Earth. The foliated cross is a stylised maize plant with the heads of humans emerging. This is Aj bringing life to the world. It is the central pillar, that which supports life. It is represented by the staffs carried by the elders of Mayan communities to this day. 

Aj is an authority, it is gentle, yet noble. It works quietly for the community it leads. It does not seek the limelight. This is a day that seeks sustenance for its people, that keeps everything in its rightful place. It is a day where we ask for the courage and bravery to stand up straight and tall, to do the right thing.

The number six is said to be the number of ultimate stability. It is the first of the three middle numbers of the cycle, the balance point neither too strong nor too weak. It is a day frequently used for ceremony thanks to its conducive energy. It represents the four directions with the Heart of the Sky and the Heart of the Earth. It also represents family, relating to the six qualities that nourish and hold families together – health, understanding, property, employment, friendship and actions.

May the Heart of the Sky be in My Heart

May My Heart be in the Heart of the Earth

May the Heart of the Earth be in My Heart

May My Heart be in the Heath of the Sky

2 thoughts on “6 Aj – 28th January 2016”

  1. I do not pretend to be an expert on all kinds of Celtic crosses, but does this resemble a St. Andrew’s Cross? I was told that this particular cross goes back to at least the early 20th century, perhaps late 19th. I agree that 6, along with 8, is one of the most balanced numbers, esp. for ceremony. Have you ever seen those sliver -topped staffs that the Mo mos indigenous council carry around with them? Symbols of authority. I was told that these staffs ought also to be described as “aj.”

  2. It is very much like the Patriachal cross, perhaps seen more in Eastern Europe, and sometimes even with a diagonal second bar reinforcing the idea of perspective and the four directions. I don’t know if I have seen it in British culture so much. Yes, I have seen the silver topped staffs, but actually in San Pablo last year at the Feria. It is amazing when you scratch just a little bit below the surface, the older culture is still there.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.