Tag Archives: Endings

7 E’ (18th September 2017)

7 E'

The day 7 E’ gives us the opportunity to cross the finish line, to complete a journey and to see where the next path might take us. It is time to take the final steps, on whatever path we are walking, time to enjoy our accomplishment and to pick out our next journey.

When we have journeyed through life, there is no doubt we have accumulated knowledge, understanding and perhaps even wisdom through our experiences. The path never really ends, one journey will always lead to another. However, we may come to a point where a particular stage comes to a culmination. In the physical journey this is obvious, we reach our destination, possibly the top of the mountain. But when we get to the top of the mountain, what do we see? Possibilities of new journeys as we are able to see all the paths leading to other mountains. We might rest and enjoy the view for a while as we consider our options, but it is essential that that we move on. To do this we need to make a decision on our direction using the experience of the path we just completed to guide us. From the top of the mountain, the end of the (ascending) path, we can see everywhere we went, and everything we experienced, on our journey to get there. Our successes and failures, out defeats and our victories, our tears and our smiles. Today is a day of bringing closure to a part of our life, a journey that has been completed.

The path that led to the top of the pyramid. Visiting La Danta at El Mirador had been a dream of mine for 22 years. Here I celebrate taking the final steps of a very long journey by sounding my conch. As I see all around I now look for a new adventure.
The path that led to the top of the pyramid. Climbing La Danta at El Mirador had been a dream of mine for 22 years. Here I celebrate taking the final steps of a very long journey by sounding my conch. As I can see all around I now look for a new adventure. From the top of La Danta, we could see the pyramids at El Tintal, where we had come from, and Nakbe, where we were going. Picture by Litmus A. Freeman

 

Nawal E’ represents the journey of discovery, the life path in both its physical and spiritual aspects. E’ is the explorer, it craves novelty. It inspires travel to understand different cultures and ways of life, it is a seeker of experience. It can be a thrill seeker, and sometimes will take risks to understand what it is examining. Whilst it gains experience and understanding through physical travel, E’ also drives us to explore our inner world, helping us to understand our own minds and hearts, and those of others. E’ sometimes creates a restlessness, the desire to find new things within the world means that E’ finds it difficult to sit still.

E’ can sometimes cause us to explore simply for the sake of exploration, we seek the new experience because it is there. This can give rise to a lack of direction, aimless wandering. However, even in its wanderings E’ is discovering. It may not know exactly where it is going, but it will when it gets there. In it’s best aspect, E’ seeks out knowledge and experience in order to form an understanding which brings wisdom. E’ enjoys sharing the wisdom gained with its peers, for the enrichment of the community.

E’ is another of the classic  carriers of the year, or year lords. It is said that E’ years tend to be some of the more gentle and favourable years. E’  is seen as a good natured nawal. E’ days are considered to be good days on which to travel and explore, whether that be externally or internally. It is a day to find or remember your path, a day to ask for your path to be cleared of obstructions, and a day to ask for guidance and protection on your path.

If we imagine the numbers 1 through 13 as a pyramid, the number seven would be at the top. Seven is the number of balance, it gives the ability to weigh up situations and see all points of view. While this may be very noble, it may lead to indecision.

The numbers of the days set out as a pyramid.
The numbers of the days as they appear through the trecena. Here they can also be set out as a pyramid, reaching the peak is also the end of a journey.

The number seven is the mid-point of the range of numbers, as we would see them,  but it is also known as a number of death and endings. This which would seem strange as it is only half way through the journey. However, another representation of the change of state of the soul, showing half of the journey (1-7) in the mortal world and half (8-13) in the other world. 7 Is the final number that appears in the bottom row before we move to the top row, suggesting the transition between realms. The numbers 1 and 7 embrace all other numbers as they appear in the sequence of nawales, and thus give a suggestion of beginnings and endings.

Number Sequence.jpg

7 Ajpu (28th July 2017)

7 AjpuLearning to see the good in all things is a great idea, but sometimes it can become a distraction. This may be something that needs to be addressed today.

When standing on top of the pyramid, you can see all around you, although maybe not the detail. The divinity of Ajpu combined with energy of the 7 may lead to the ability  to really see the holiness all around you, or at least it may appear to be. This may lead to a slightly plastic reality, and certainly to the “rose tinted glasses.” Yes, everything is a part of oneness, but sometimes on close examination, it would not be something that you would choose to include in your reality.

The lesson of 7 is to make decisions and its other aspect is that of death and finality. Every time we make a decision it results in the death of the other possibilities that existed at the point in time when we made the decision. With your feet firmly planted on the ground, examine carefully what you hold holy, and make the choice as to whether to keep it in your reality or not. Correct identification can lead to the pinnacle of divinity, an illusion may lead to an uncomfortable fall.

Itzamna, patron of the day Ajpu, emerges from the mouth of the serpent, from the Dresden Codex
Itzamna, patron of the day Ajpu, emerges from the mouth of the serpent, from the Dresden Codex

Nawal Ajpu is once again a nawal with a multitude of meanings and translations. In the Yucatec language it is known as Ahau, in Kiche is is also known as Junajpu. These are in turn variously translated into English as lord, hunter, blow gunner, flower and sun. Each one of the translations has it’s merits, and represents an aspect of this auspicious nawal.

Within the ancient Mayan society, the royals were not just political leaders of their particular city-states, they were priest-kings and priest-queens. They served as the conduit to the divine, deriving their wisdom for guiding their people through their connection with the Heart of the Earth and the Heart of the Sky. This wisdom enriched both the ruling dynasty and their people, as they would be working in harmony with the gods. Thus the ruler of the city was also the physical embodiment of the divine, and it is to this that Ajpu is so closely related. Likewise it represents our potential, the state of divinity to which we may aspire.

Ajpu represents the holiness in life, the divinity in the physical world, and our search for it. It is that moment when you look closely at a flower to see the beautiful detail, the moment when you see the magnificence of the landscape you live within, the beauty in your child’s eyes or in the face of your partner. It is the random act of kindness that restores our faith in humanity. It is the search for the underlying meaning in all situations, understanding that each person is a part of the whole. Whether we like it or not, and however we judge it, we are all a part of creation. Our every action, and every action of others gives us the opportunity to explore ourselves and our reaction, whether we are attracted or repelled by the action of others. However, sometimes Ajpu can lead us to become immersed in the other world, to lose sight of reality, it is important to remember to stay in touch with the Heart of the Earth as we reach to the Heart of the Sky.

Number Sequence.jpg
The sequence of numbers as they appear with each appearance of a nawal. Here we see that the sequence begins with 1 and ends with 7, giving 7 as a number of finality.

The number seven is the mid-point of the range of numbers. It is known as a number of death and endings, which would seem strange as it is only half way through. It is another representation of the change of state of the soul, showing half of the journey (1-6) in the mortal world and half (8-13) in the otherworld.

The numbers of the days set out as a pyramid.
The numbers of the days as they appear through the trecena. Here they can also be set out as a pyramid, reaching the peak is also the end of a journey.

If we imagine the numbers 1 through 13 as a pyramid, the number seven would be at the top. Seven is the number of balance, it gives the ability to weigh up situations and see all points of view. While this may be very noble, it may lead to indecision.

The numbers of the days set out as a pyramid.

7 Tz’i (20th March 2017 – Equinox)

7 Tz'iToday we can see cycles coming to a conclusion. This is the last day before the beginning of a new ceremonial cycle and the nawal Tz’i has completed its task of lovingly guiding us through this time.

Today can be seen as a day to release one guide in order to allow another to come in. Here we see the nawal Tz’i on top of the pyramid, having accompanied us to our destination, the conclusion of our journey through the ceremonial cycle. The old guide now fades away to allow the new guide to step forward and accompany us through the next 260 days.

With the nawal Tz’i also representing justice, this may be a day when legal matters come to a head. This may be related to social justice where the unethical are finally brought to task over their behaviour. Justice needs to be served to bring society into balance before the new ceremonies start. This is a day to petition the nawal Tz’i to help you finalise any outstanding legal matter should you have them. If you are in a drawn out legal process, today is the day to conclude matters.

Whilst this finality of justice will involve some ultimate judgement, it is important to remember that another property of the nawal Tz’i is unconditional love. Here we see this combined with the number that gives the ability to see in all directions, all points of view. This gives us the ability to make judgement not with a spirit of vengeance, but with the ability to view the differences unconditionally, bringing a particular fairness to the outcome.

Additionally, today is the day of the equinox, a day of equal light and darkness. We are moving out of one cycle and into the next, both within the Earth’s cycle and within the cycle of the calendar. This gives an extra sense of equilibrium, very much in synchronicity with the Chol Q’ij. This is the time of the year that changes are happening the most rapidly. In the Northern hemisphere, the dead world is coming back to life rapidly as the days lengthen with the greatest rate of change. In the Southern hemisphere the reverse is true, yet the rate of change is just as great. It is this change that completes the cycle of life and today we celebrate this balance which puts everything in its rightful place. Consequentially, we also look to bring ourselves into balance today, and with the energy of Tz’i guiding us, our focus may be on bringing balance to the natural world through upholding the natural laws. It is a day to petition the nawal Tz’i for guidance in doing so.

The dog sits by the cauldron, from the Madrid Codex

Tz’i is possibly the nawal with the most colourful reputation. Some describe it as the nawal of “sex, drugs and rock and roll” and it has the possibility to live up to that label. One of the functions an Aj Q’ij (Mayan spiritual guide) performs is divination, usually using red seeds called Tz’ite. If a question is asked about a relationship and Tz’i comes up in the reading, it is seen as a sign of  infidelity. Tz’i is instinctual, and closes its ears to reason when it gets an idea, particularly when it is hormonally driven. This is the worst possible aspect of Tz’i and when it falls down, it does so spectacularly, which is why it tends to be remembered for those events.

However, what is sometimes forgotten is the other side of Tz’i, which is the side more frequently displayed. Just as Tz’i can represent infidelity, it also represents faith and loyalty, and just as it can be the trouble maker, it also represents law. It is the nawal of police, lawyers and judges. Tz’i is unwavering faith, unconditional loyalty. The totem animal of Tz’i is the dog, and through the actions of dogs we can understand both the loyalty aspect, and the instinctual. Tz’i is also the guide and protector on life’s path, ensuring that its charge travels safely. It is a day when your faith or loyalty may be tested,  where your instincts are stimulated. The positive traits of this day give rise to to some of the greatest displays of friendship, but be aware that your loyalty may be tested by temptation.

Number Sequence.jpg
The sequence of numbers as they appear with each appearance of a nawal. Here we see that the sequence begins with 1 and ends with 7, giving 7 as a number of finality.

The number seven is the mid-point of the range of numbers. It is known as a number of death and endings, which would seem strange as it is only half way through. It is another representation of the change of state of the soul, showing half of the journey (1-6) in the mortal world and half (8-13) in the otherworld.

The numbers of the days set out as a pyramid.
The numbers of the days as they appear through the trecena. Here they can also be set out as a pyramid, reaching the peak is also the end of a journey.

If we imagine the numbers 1 through 13 as a pyramid, the number seven would be at the top. Seven is the number of balance, it gives the ability to weigh up situations and see all points of view. While this may be very noble, it may lead to indecision.

7 E’ (1st January 2017)

7 E'

The day 7 E’ gives us the opportunity to cross the finish line, to complete a journey and to see where the next path might take us. It is time to take the final steps, on whatever path we are walking, time to enjoy our accomplishment and to pick out our next journey.

When we have journeyed through life, there is no doubt we have accumulated knowledge, understanding and perhaps even wisdom through our experiences. The path never really ends, one journey will always lead to another. However, we may come to a point where a particular stage comes to a culmination. In the physical journey this is obvious, we reach our destination, possibly the top of the mountain. But when we get to the top of the mountain, what do we see? Possibilities of new journeys as we are able to see all the paths leading to other mountains. We might rest and enjoy the view for a while as we consider our options, but it is essential that that we move on. To do this we need to make a decision on our direction using the experience of the path we just completed to guide us. From the top of the mountain, the end of the (ascending) path, we can see everywhere we went, and everything we experienced, on our journey to get there. Our successes and failures, out defeats and our victories, our tears and our smiles. Today is a day of bringing closure to a part of our life, a journey that has been completed.

The path that led to the top of the pyramid. Visiting La Danta at El Mirador had been a dream of mine for 22 years. Here I celebrate taking the final steps of a very long journey by sounding my conch. As I see all around I now look for a new adventure.
The path that led to the top of the pyramid. Climbing La Danta at El Mirador had been a dream of mine for 22 years. Here I celebrate taking the final steps of a very long journey by sounding my conch. As I can see all around I now look for a new adventure. From the top of La Danta, we could see the pyramids at El Tintal, where we had come from, and Nakbe, where we were going. Picture by Litmus A. Freeman

 

Nawal E’ represents the journey of discovery, the life path in both its physical and spiritual aspects. E’ is the explorer, it craves novelty. It inspires travel to understand different cultures and ways of life, it is a seeker of experience. It can be a thrill seeker, and sometimes will take risks to understand what it is examining. Whilst it gains experience and understanding through physical travel, E’ also drives us to explore our inner world, helping us to understand our own minds and hearts, and those of others. E’ sometimes creates a restlessness, the desire to find new things within the world means that E’ finds it difficult to sit still.

E’ can sometimes cause us to explore simply for the sake of exploration, we seek the new experience because it is there. This can give rise to a lack of direction, aimless wandering. However, even in its wanderings E’ is discovering. It may not know exactly where it is going, but it will when it gets there. In it’s best aspect, E’ seeks out knowledge and experience in order to form an understanding which brings wisdom. E’ enjoys sharing the wisdom gained with its peers, for the enrichment of the community.

E’ is another of the classic  carriers of the year, or year lords. It is said that E’ years tend to be some of the more gentle and favourable years. E’  is seen as a good natured nawal. E’ days are considered to be good days on which to travel and explore, whether that be externally or internally. It is a day to find or remember your path, a day to ask for your path to be cleared of obstructions, and a day to ask for guidance and protection on your path.

If we imagine the numbers 1 through 13 as a pyramid, the number seven would be at the top. Seven is the number of balance, it gives the ability to weigh up situations and see all points of view. While this may be very noble, it may lead to indecision.

The numbers of the days set out as a pyramid.
The numbers of the days as they appear through the trecena. Here they can also be set out as a pyramid, reaching the peak is also the end of a journey.

The number seven is the mid-point of the range of numbers, as we would see them,  but it is also known as a number of death and endings. This which would seem strange as it is only half way through the journey. However, another representation of the change of state of the soul, showing half of the journey (1-7) in the mortal world and half (8-13) in the other world. 7 Is the final number that appears in the bottom row before we move to the top row, suggesting the transition between realms. The numbers 1 and 7 embrace all other numbers as they appear in the sequence of nawales, and thus give a suggestion of beginnings and endings.

Number Sequence.jpg