Tag Archives: Ajpu

8 Ajpu (6th September 2017)

8 AjpuThe nawal Ajpu helps us to recognise the divinity in all that surrounds us, it sends us on our quest to understand the holiness of life. Today it shows us that we have to look in wholeness, in every aspect.

The nawal Ajpu is representative the heroes of the Popol Vuh, Junajpu, Jun Junajpu and Wucub Junajpu. They were the ones who descended to the underworld to Xibalbans, the lords of the place of fright. Jun Junajpu and Wucub Junajpu failed in their task and were killed, but Jun Junajpu’s severed head magically impregnated the maiden Blood Moon with his twin sons, Junajpu and Xbalamque. Where the father and uncle failed, the second generation were victorious and the Xibalbans were defeated, bringing peace to those who dwell in the earthly realm.

With Ajpu representing the sun we can see this interplay as representing the victory of light over darkness. The days numbered 8 are commonly used for ceremony, and today this ceremony could celebrate and honour the heroes that bring the light into our lives, and the divinity that surrounds us in the world. However, without their opponents, heroes would not exist and neither would the legendary stories we celebrate whatever our tradition. The challenges we confront are what bring out the divinity within us, without them there would be no quests, no progress. It is a day to celebrate our failures as well as our victories, all the things which have brought out our the hero from within us.

It is easy to see the beauty in what we have been taught is divine, but can you see it within the mundane, or even in what is considered to be ugly? Can you find the divinity in what you judge to be a negative situation? It is a day to see that all has come from oneness, everything is part of the divine.

Itzamna emerges from the mouth of the serpent, from the Dresden Codex
Itzamna emerges from the mouth of the serpent, from the Dresden Codex

Nawal Ajpu is once again a nawal with a multitude of meanings and translations. In the Yucatec language it is known as Ahau, in Kiche is is also known as Junajpu. These are in turn variously translated into English as lord, hunter, blow gunner, flower and sun. Each one of the translations has it’s merits, and represents an aspect of this auspicious nawal.

Within the ancient Mayan society, the royals were not just political leaders of their particular city-states, they were priest-kings and priest-queens. They served as the conduit to the divine, deriving their wisdom for guiding their people through their connection with the Heart of the Earth and the Heart of the Sky. This wisdom enriched both the ruling dynasty and their people, as they would be working in harmony with the gods. Thus the ruler of the city was also the physical embodiment of the divine, and it is to this that Ajpu is so closely related. Likewise it represents our potential, the state of divinity to which we may aspire.

Ajpu represents the holiness in life, the divinity in the physical world, and our search for it. It is that moment when you look closely at a flower to see the beautiful detail, the moment when you see the magnificence of the landscape you live within, the beauty in your child’s eyes or in the face of your partner. It is the random act of kindness that restores our faith in humanity. It is the search for the underlying meaning in all situations, understanding that each person is a part of the whole. Whether we like it or not, and however we judge it, we are all a part of creation. Our every action, and every action of others gives us the opportunity to explore ourselves and our reaction, whether we are attracted or repelled by the action of others. However, sometimes Ajpu can lead us to become immersed in the other world, to lose sight of reality, it is important to remember to stay in touch with the Heart of the Earth as we reach to the Heart of the Sky.

The number 8 is considered to be a number of wholeness. It can be seen as birth (1) and death (7) combined to represent the whole cycle of the soul. It can also be seen as the point where the four first men who raised the sky from the sea were joined by their wives and the world become whole. It is the most common day for ceremonies to be made, it is still in the balanced range of numbers and is an even number, which is also considered fortunate. As this wholeness represents every aspect of the energy of the day with which it is coupled, it is the wholeness of the nawal that is addressed in ceremony.

1 Ajpu (17th August 2017)

1 AjpuWhether you use the name Ajpu or Junajpu for this nawal, this combination gives the name Junajpu or Jun Junajpu, one of the legendary hero twins, or their father. This day could see the divine begin to return.

There is a huge amount of symbolism within this day, and the majority of it could be considered to be favourable. With the number 1 representing the new emergence, the birth and Ajpu representing divinity, we can understand that there is an opportunity to bring something new and meaningful into the world today. The “child” which emerges today was delivered by 13 Kawok, the spirit midwife. Ajpu is art, it is beauty, it is the re-emergence of the sun after the storm. It is the resurrection of the maize, the new life and light in the world.

Of course, the number 1 represents potential, and this is what we see today, this is the seed which is planted. It is the beginning of the process, the first light of the fire. The ceremonial midpoint of this trecena is 8 Kej, the alternative initiation day of the Aj Q’ij, and the destination is 13 E’ – the spiritual path. With these days falling in the next two weeks, if is no surprise that it might be a time of powerful changes. Today the fire needs kindling, it needs tending gently in order to grow into the great light it could become. You have the potential to bring out the divine in your world, to see the holiness in everything around you. You might just need to put in a little more effort to bring out the true light. It is there, waiting for you to notice.

Itzamna emerges from the mouth of the serpent, from the Dresden Codex
Itzamna, patron of the day Ajpu, emerges from the mouth of the serpent, from the Dresden Codex

Nawal Ajpu is once again a nawal with a multitude of meanings and translations. In the Yucatec language it is known as Ahau, in Kiche is is also known as Junajpu. These are in turn variously translated into English as lord, hunter, blow gunner, flower and sun. Each one of the translations has it’s merits, and represents an aspect of this auspicious nawal.

Within the ancient Mayan society, the royals were not just political leaders of their particular city-states, they were priest-kings and priest-queens. They served as the conduit to the divine, deriving their wisdom for guiding their people through their connection with the Heart of the Earth and the Heart of the Sky. This wisdom enriched both the ruling dynasty and their people, as they would be working in harmony with the gods. Thus the ruler of the city was also the physical embodiment of the divine, and it is to this that Ajpu is so closely related. Likewise it represents our potential, the state of divinity to which we may aspire.

Ajpu represents the holiness in life, the divinity in the physical world, and our search for it. It is that moment when you look closely at a flower to see the beautiful detail, the moment when you see the magnificence of the landscape you live within, the beauty in your child’s eyes or in the face of your partner. It is the random act of kindness that restores our faith in humanity. It is the search for the underlying meaning in all situations, understanding that each person is a part of the whole. Whether we like it or not, and however we judge it, we are all a part of creation. Our every action, and every action of others gives us the opportunity to explore ourselves and our reaction, whether we are attracted or repelled by the action of others. However, sometimes Ajpu can lead us to become immersed in the other world, to lose sight of reality, it is important to remember to stay in touch with the Heart of the Earth as we reach to the Heart of the Sky.

The number 1 is representative of the seed, of unity. It represents birth and beginnings. It is a low and odd number, which usually represents something challenging. However, the seed can grow into a mighty tree, it is full of potential. It just needs the correct nutrients and conditions to germinate and develop, just as sometimes we need encouragement to develop our ideas.

7 Ajpu (28th July 2017)

7 AjpuLearning to see the good in all things is a great idea, but sometimes it can become a distraction. This may be something that needs to be addressed today.

When standing on top of the pyramid, you can see all around you, although maybe not the detail. The divinity of Ajpu combined with energy of the 7 may lead to the ability  to really see the holiness all around you, or at least it may appear to be. This may lead to a slightly plastic reality, and certainly to the “rose tinted glasses.” Yes, everything is a part of oneness, but sometimes on close examination, it would not be something that you would choose to include in your reality.

The lesson of 7 is to make decisions and its other aspect is that of death and finality. Every time we make a decision it results in the death of the other possibilities that existed at the point in time when we made the decision. With your feet firmly planted on the ground, examine carefully what you hold holy, and make the choice as to whether to keep it in your reality or not. Correct identification can lead to the pinnacle of divinity, an illusion may lead to an uncomfortable fall.

Itzamna, patron of the day Ajpu, emerges from the mouth of the serpent, from the Dresden Codex
Itzamna, patron of the day Ajpu, emerges from the mouth of the serpent, from the Dresden Codex

Nawal Ajpu is once again a nawal with a multitude of meanings and translations. In the Yucatec language it is known as Ahau, in Kiche is is also known as Junajpu. These are in turn variously translated into English as lord, hunter, blow gunner, flower and sun. Each one of the translations has it’s merits, and represents an aspect of this auspicious nawal.

Within the ancient Mayan society, the royals were not just political leaders of their particular city-states, they were priest-kings and priest-queens. They served as the conduit to the divine, deriving their wisdom for guiding their people through their connection with the Heart of the Earth and the Heart of the Sky. This wisdom enriched both the ruling dynasty and their people, as they would be working in harmony with the gods. Thus the ruler of the city was also the physical embodiment of the divine, and it is to this that Ajpu is so closely related. Likewise it represents our potential, the state of divinity to which we may aspire.

Ajpu represents the holiness in life, the divinity in the physical world, and our search for it. It is that moment when you look closely at a flower to see the beautiful detail, the moment when you see the magnificence of the landscape you live within, the beauty in your child’s eyes or in the face of your partner. It is the random act of kindness that restores our faith in humanity. It is the search for the underlying meaning in all situations, understanding that each person is a part of the whole. Whether we like it or not, and however we judge it, we are all a part of creation. Our every action, and every action of others gives us the opportunity to explore ourselves and our reaction, whether we are attracted or repelled by the action of others. However, sometimes Ajpu can lead us to become immersed in the other world, to lose sight of reality, it is important to remember to stay in touch with the Heart of the Earth as we reach to the Heart of the Sky.

Number Sequence.jpg
The sequence of numbers as they appear with each appearance of a nawal. Here we see that the sequence begins with 1 and ends with 7, giving 7 as a number of finality.

The number seven is the mid-point of the range of numbers. It is known as a number of death and endings, which would seem strange as it is only half way through. It is another representation of the change of state of the soul, showing half of the journey (1-6) in the mortal world and half (8-13) in the otherworld.

The numbers of the days set out as a pyramid.
The numbers of the days as they appear through the trecena. Here they can also be set out as a pyramid, reaching the peak is also the end of a journey.

If we imagine the numbers 1 through 13 as a pyramid, the number seven would be at the top. Seven is the number of balance, it gives the ability to weigh up situations and see all points of view. While this may be very noble, it may lead to indecision.

The numbers of the days set out as a pyramid.

13 Ajpu (8th July 2017)

13 AjpuThe day 13 Ajpu is a very special day. It is the flower finally opening, the creation of the divine manifesting into the physical world, direct from the spirit world.

This can be seen as what we have been waiting for appearing, nine months of gestation leading to this day. It is the rebirth of the Maize Lord, the resurrection and ascension to the spirit world all in one. It can be seen as the ascension point to the next level or the point where the holiness of the spirit world is revealed on Earth. Personally, it is a day when we see ourselves and the true selves of those around us, a day which allows us to resonate with who we truly are. We may judge those around us based on our values, but what we may see in them today is the truth of who they are.

It may be a day when the feeling of divinity in the world is intoxicating, when you notice the extraordinary around you. It is essential, then, to stay well grounded. Ajpu has a penchant for spiritual intrigue. It draws people towards the overly mystical, they become lost in its charms, bewitched by its words, and with the otherworld power of the 13 attached, this may result in an intense experience.

Make your art today, bring the essence of the divine into the physical world. Look for inspiration in the natural world, the spirit world will guide you to create exceptional beauty.

The flower ripens to open on 13 Ajpu
The flower ripens to open on 13 Ajpu

Nawal Ajpu is once again a nawal with a multitude of meanings and translations. In the Yucatec language it is known as Ahau, in Kiche is is also known as Junajpu. These are in turn variously translated into English as lord, hunter, blow gunner, flower and sun. Each one of the translations has it’s merits, and represents an aspect of this auspicious nawal.

Within the ancient Mayan society, the royals were not just political leaders of their particular city-states, they were priest-kings and priest-queens. They served as the conduit to the divine, deriving their wisdom for guiding their people through their connection with the Heart of the Earth and the Heart of the Sky. This wisdom enriched both the ruling dynasty and their people, as they would be working in harmony with the gods. Thus the ruler of the city was also the physical embodiment of the divine, and it is to this that Ajpu is so closely related. Likewise it represents our potential, the state of divinity to which we may aspire.

Ajpu represents the holiness in life, the divinity in the physical world, and our search for it. It is that moment when you look closely at a flower to see the beautiful detail, the moment when you see the magnificence of the landscape you live within, the beauty in your child’s eyes or in the face of your partner. It is the random act of kindness that restores our faith in humanity. It is the search for the underlying meaning in all situations, understanding that each person is a part of the whole. Whether we like it or not, and however we judge it, we are all a part of creation. Our every action, and every action of others gives us the opportunity to explore ourselves and our reaction, whether we are attracted or repelled by the action of others. However, sometimes Ajpu can lead us to become immersed in the other world, to lose sight of reality, it is important to remember to stay in touch with the Heart of the Earth as we reach to the Heart of the Sky.

The number 13 is the final number. It represents the spirit world. It is said that on Halloween, the veil between the worlds is the thinnest. However within the sacred calendar, this thinning happens every 13 days. This connection with the spirit world creates a powerful day, where both the positive and negative aspects of the nawal it is attached to come through strongly. It is a very good day for activities such as divinations, however, ceremonies on 13 days are generally only carried out by the most experienced Aj Q’ij who understand how to work with that strength of energy.

6 Ajpu (18th June 2017)

6 AjpuToday the nawal of the divine combines with the number representing stability and family values. It is a day of recognising the holiness in what is directly around you.

Both the number four and the number six are said to represent stability, but there is a different quality to each of them. The number four represents the four directions, as well as many other phenomenon such as the cycles of the Sun both in the daily (midnight, sunrise, midday and sunset) and annual (solstices and equinoxes). These things are what bring balance to our world, they keep the harmonious rhythm in the physical realm, and can be seen very much as representing physical stability. The number 6 carries those qualities, but has the addition of an extra axis. If we think of the number four representing the cardinal points, the number six adds a polar axis to these, bringing in up and down, the Heart of the Sky and the Heart of the Earth. The number six has the stability of the number four embellished by an energetic connection to the masculine and feminine principals. It could almost be seen as the number four represents the physical world and the number 6 represents the physical world animated by the life force energy.

Today we see the number 6 connected with the nawal Ajpu, representing divinity and holiness. Ajpu reminds us of the beauty in our world, it shows us the hand of the divine in all things. Perhaps this might sound a little flaky, after all Ajpu energy can sometimes become too mystical for its own good and lose sight of the real world. However, the Ajpu energy gives us the ability to perceive things that cannot always be rationalised, it reminds us of what we are all part of, but cannot be defined. The energy of the number 6 would suggest that today the Ajpu energy might reveal to us the way that the energy flows from heaven and Earth into our physical reality. This may be experienced in a very practical and physical way without losing its divinity.

Thus, the day 6 Ajpu can bring stability to the divinity we experience in life. In particular it can be a day on which to appreciate the blessing of family. It is a day when you may experience the holiness of life in very stable and down to Earth ways, which remind you that there is  a little divinity everywhere. The stability and balance of the six should allow you to appreciate this without being overwhelmed by mysticality.

Kinich Ahau, the solar deity, lord of space and time. From the Dresden Codex.
Kinich Ahau, the solar deity, lord of space and time. From the Dresden Codex.

Nawal Ajpu is once again a nawal with a multitude of meanings and translations. In the Yucatec language it is known as Ahau, in Kiche is is also known as Junajpu. These are in turn variously translated into English as lord, hunter, blow gunner, flower and sun. Each one of the translations has it’s merits, and represents an aspect of this auspicious nawal.

Within the ancient Mayan society, the royals were not just political leaders of their particular city-states, they were priest-kings and priest-queens. They served as the conduit to the divine, deriving their wisdom for guiding their people through their connection with the Heart of the Earth and the Heart of the Sky. This wisdom enriched both the ruling dynasty and their people, as they would be working in harmony with the gods. Thus the ruler of the city was also the physical embodiment of the divine, and it is to this that Ajpu is so closely related. Likewise it represents our potential, the state of divinity to which we may aspire.

Ajpu represents the holiness in life, the divinity in the physical world, and our search for it. It is that moment when you look closely at a flower to see the beautiful detail, the moment when you see the magnificence of the landscape you live within, the beauty in your child’s eyes or in the your partner. It is the random act of kindness that restores our faith in humanity. It is the search for the underlying meaning in all situations, understanding that each person is a part of the whole. Whether we like it or not, and however we judge it, we are all a part of creation. Our every action, and every action of others gives us the opportunity to explore ourselves and our reaction, whether we are attracted or repelled by the action of others. However, sometimes Ajpu can lead us to become immersed in the other world, to lose sight of reality, it is important to remember to stay in touch with the Heart of the Earth as we reach to the Heart of the Sky.

The number six is said to be the number of ultimate stability. It is the first of the three middle numbers of the cycle, the balance point neither too strong nor too weak. It is a day frequently used for ceremony thanks to its conducive energy. It represents the four directions with the Heart of the Sky and the Heart of the Earth. It also represents family, relating to the six qualities that nourish and hold families together – health, understanding, property, employment, friendship and actions.

The cross at the top of the central hill, Paclom, in Momostenango. Paclom is known as "the six place" and the two armed cross represents the four directions combining with the Heart of the Earth and the Heart of the Sky. This picture was taken on Wajxakib B'atz, February 2010.
The cross at the top of the central hill, Paclom, in Momostenango. Paclom is known as “the six place” and the two armed cross represents the four directions combining with the Heart of the Earth and the Heart of the Sky. This picture was taken on Wajxakib B’atz, February 2010.

12 Ajpu (29th May 2017)

12 AjpuThe day 12 Ajpu is a day to truly recognise the divine within our lives. It is a day where we might feel the spirit and holiness which has come to create this moment which we are in now. 

There are particular moments in life where a destination is reached and you realise how many other points in life have contributed to your arrival there. Of course, this can be said of any moment, as it is preceded by all others. However, today is rather special. Today is a day when you may truly recognise the divinity you have brought into your life through a series of previous experiences. You are where you are today because of choices you have made, and even sometimes experiences you may not have chosen. Today is a day to recognise the beauty around you right now, that you have arrived into as a result of the culmination of your life experiences.

It is also the legacy of our ancestors and what they have created for us in the now. It is a day to savour that which brings you joy in life, that which you consider to be your blessings.


Nawal Ajpu is once again a nawal with a multitude of meanings and translations. In the Yucatec language it is known as Ahau, in Kiche is is also known as Junajpu. These are in turn variously translated into English as lord, hunter, blow gunner, flower and sun. Each one of the translations has it’s merits, and represents an aspect of this auspicious nawal.

Within the ancient Mayan society, the royals were not just political leaders of their particular city-states, they were priest-kings and priest-queens. They served as the conduit to the divine, deriving their wisdom for guiding their people through their connection with the Heart of the Earth and the Heart of the Sky. This wisdom enriched both the ruling dynasty and their people, as they would be working in harmony with the gods. Thus the ruler of the city was also the physical embodiment of the divine, and it is to this that Ajpu is so closely related. Likewise it represents our potential, the state of divinity to which we may aspire.

Ajpu represents the holiness in life, the divinity in the physical world, and our search for it. It is that moment when you look closely at a flower to see the beautiful detail, the moment when you see the magnificence of the landscape you live within, the beauty in your child’s eyes or in the face of your partner. It is the random act of kindness that restores our faith in humanity. It is the search for the underlying meaning in all situations, understanding that each person is a part of the whole. Whether we like it or not, and however we judge it, we are all a part of creation. Our every action, and every action of others gives us the opportunity to explore ourselves and our reaction, whether we are attracted or repelled by the action of others. However, sometimes Ajpu can lead us to become immersed in the other world, to lose sight of reality, it is important to remember to stay in touch with the Heart of the Earth as we reach to the Heart of the Sky.

The number 12 is the penultimate number. In some ways it can be seen as the last Earthly number, the number 13 representing the spirit world. We travelled through the mortal world with 1 through 6, then the other world with 7 through 12. In this way 12 can be seen as a point of bringing all of the experiences into one bundle for presentation to the spirit world as we step into 13. As such, the number 12 brings a wealth of experience into one place, it is rather like writing an autobiography. It is totality, all that is, brought together.

5 Ajpu (9th May 2017)

5 AjpuThe day 5 Ajpu may be a day when recognising the divine in the world around you may be challenging. However, hard work is rewarded, things don’t always get handed to you on a plate! It may also be a day to find a higher meaning in your work or everyday tasks.

The energy of the nawal Ajpu often drives us to try to find the higher meaning in things around us. It fuels our quest for the divine in the everyday. Of course, everything is part of the oneness from where it all came, but over time some things have become very separated from that source. We may have many judgements about the world in which we live, many of which will be correct. However, sometimes we may become overwhelmed by these as the mass media bombards us with images of man’s inhumanity and disrespect for the Earth. Sometimes this can lead us to losing sight of the beauty in our world.

Today is a day when this may be particularly hard, however, the energy of nawal Ajpu encourages us to try. This may be a day when finding that goodness, or divinity, in the world around you may help to remind you of the true beauty which can be perceived. You will just need to actively go and seek it rather than expect it to come to you.

Kinich Ahau, the solar deity, lord of space and time. From the Dresden Codex.
Kinich Ahau, the solar deity, lord of space and time. From the Dresden Codex.

Nawal Ajpu is once again a nawal with a multitude of meanings and translations. In the Yucatec language it is known as Ahau, in Kiche is is also known as Junajpu. These are in turn variously translated into English as lord, hunter, blow gunner, flower and sun. Each one of the translations has it’s merits, and represents an aspect of this auspicious nawal.

Within the ancient Mayan society, the royals were not just political leaders of their particular city-states, they were priest-kings and priest-queens. They served as the conduit to the divine, deriving their wisdom for guiding their people through their connection with the Heart of the Earth and the Heart of the Sky. This wisdom enriched both the ruling dynasty and their people, as they would be working in harmony with the gods. Thus the ruler of the city was also the physical embodiment of the divine, and it is to this that Ajpu is so closely related. Likewise it represents our potential, the state of divinity to which we may aspire.

Ajpu represents the holiness in life, the divinity in the physical world, and our search for it. It is that moment when you look closely at a flower to see the beautiful detail, the moment when you see the magnificence of the landscape you live within, the beauty in your child’s eyes or in the face of your partner. It is the random act of kindness that restores our faith in humanity. It is the search for the underlying meaning in all situations, understanding that each person is a part of the whole. Whether we like it or not, and however we judge it, we are all a part of creation. Our every action, and every action of others gives us the opportunity to explore ourselves and our reaction, whether we are attracted or repelled by the action of others. However, sometimes Ajpu can lead us to become immersed in the other world, to lose sight of reality, it is important to remember to stay in touch with the Heart of the Earth as we reach to the Heart of the Sky.

The Sacred Mayan calendar is often said to be a calendar of human life, and parts of it can be seen as a microcosm of the human body. The number five is one of these parts. It is representative of the hand with it’s five digits. It is with our hands that we work, and with what we earn for that work that we pay our debts. Five is also a number that relates to the sacred fire where we pay our debts with offerings and prayers. Five might be so busy working that it fails to remember what it is working for. It can also signify that what it is attached to becomes work, or is “hard work”.

11 Ajpu (19th April 2017)

11 AjpuToday you might find yourself almost desperately searching for the divinity in the world, as its  combination with the energy of the 11 may send you on a convincing wandering, even if you don’t know why.

It is as if you can feel it somewhere close. Somewhere out there there is a goodness, a true holiness that can be embraced and experienced. It brings everything into its divine state, yourself, your family and your community. The strong energetic combination with the number 11 gives a drive and purpose to find it, but with no direction of where to go, or possibly even what you are really looking for. It is just better than what you are experiencing now, a better world. This can be difficult to work with, but sometimes you just need to walk for the sake of taking a walk, to open up the possibilities and opportunities. Having no destination in mind, allowing yourself to be guided by synchronicity, but walking with determination, you may make discoveries.

“If you are seeking creative ideas, go out walking. Angels whisper to a man when he goes for a walk.” Raymond Inmon

Today might not bring the exact solutions you are looking for, you might not even understand exactly how the pieces you do find fit into the divine plan. This will take some time to come together and to come to clarity. However, you will not find them at all if you do not follow the impulse to go looking for them in the first place.

Kinich Ahau, the solar deity, lord of space and time. From the Dresden Codex.
Kinich Ahau, the solar deity, lord of space and time. From the Dresden Codex.

Nawal Ajpu is once again a nawal with a multitude of meanings and translations. In the Yucatec language it is known as Ahau, in Kiche is is also known as Junajpu. These are in turn variously translated into English as lord, hunter, blow gunner, flower and sun. Each one of the translations has it’s merits, and represents an aspect of this auspicious nawal.

Within the ancient Mayan society, the royals were not just political leaders of their particular city-states, they were priest-kings and priest-queens. They served as the conduit to the divine, deriving their wisdom for guiding their people through their connection with the Heart of the Earth and the Heart of the Sky. This wisdom enriched both the ruling dynasty and their people, as they would be working in harmony with the gods. Thus the ruler of the city was also the physical embodiment of the divine, and it is to this that Ajpu is so closely related. Likewise it represents our potential, the state of divinity to which we may aspire.

Ajpu represents the holiness in life, the divinity in the physical world, and our search for it. It is that moment when you look closely at a flower to see the beautiful detail, the moment when you see the magnificence of the landscape you live within, the beauty in your child’s eyes or in the face of your partner. It is the random act of kindness that restores our faith in humanity. It is the search for the underlying meaning in all situations, understanding that each person is a part of the whole. Whether we like it or not, and however we judge it, we are all a part of creation. Our every action, and every action of others gives us the opportunity to explore ourselves and our reaction, whether we are attracted or repelled by the action of others. However, sometimes Ajpu can lead us to become immersed in the other world, to lose sight of reality, it is important to remember to stay in touch with the Heart of the Earth as we reach to the Heart of the Sky.

The number 11 is a high and odd number. This gives it some rather challenging properties, although it can come good in the end. Imagine you visit Ireland and are transfixed by the green of the hills, then you go to Morocco and are awed by the red of the buildings, then you go to the Caribbean and are moved by the turquoise sea. You return home and paint a beautiful picture using those colours. When you were in Ireland you didn’t know you were going to paint that masterpiece, you may not have even known why you were there.  This is how 11 works. You are sure you need to be doing something, but unsure why. You are collecting experience through many wanderings.

4 Ajpu (30th March 2017)

4 AjpuThe world may have been turning for many millions of years, but our cycles of creation and destruction happen repeatedly during this time. Yesterday one era was swept away, today a new era is stabilised.

The Maya calendars work in cycles which range from short to very long. The short cycles may be 13 days or 20 days. The longer ones 260 days,  52 years, 260 years, or even much longer. Each small cycle is a fractal of the larger ones, over the 20 days of the sacred calendar we can see the whole of story creation and the evolution of human consciousness. One of the longer cycles is the 13 Baktun era. The start of one of these is recorded at Quirigua on Stella C, as 13.0.0.0.0 4 Ajpu 8 Cumku, which is generally thought to equate to August 11th 3114 BCE. This is said to be a creation day for the era in which we live and each 4 Ajpu day marks a day when we re-create. If we took the 4 as representing the Sun and Ajpu translated as Lord, this is the day of the Solar Lord, Kinich Ajaw.

Whilst the world may be physically present, Ajpu brings the divine aspect into it, it brings the colours to the planet. The day 4 Ajpu is when that soul is anchored into the physical, it brings divinity to our surroundings. As the number 4 is particularly connected with the Sun, it can also be seen as bringing the light back into the world again.

Today is a day when leadership may be stabilised into the physical world, after a period of destruction or loss. It is what was conceived through the ancestors on the day 13 Aq’ab’al. It is a time when we may start to see the new light returning to the world, the beginning of a new era, particularly for the next 260 days. It gives us the opportunity to explore this new aspect of creation, to see it with new eyes and look for the holiness we might be able to find within it. It has been stabilised into the physical world, and when we are able to see it around us, we become able to see it within us.

Kinich Ahau, the solar deity, lord of space and time. From the Dresden Codex.
Kinich Ahau, the solar deity, lord of space and time. From the Dresden Codex.

Nawal Ajpu is once again a nawal with a multitude of meanings and translations. In the Yucatec language it is known as Ahau, in Kiche is is also known as Junajpu. These are in turn variously translated into English as lord, hunter, blow gunner, flower and sun. Each one of the translations has it’s merits, and represents an aspect of this auspicious nawal.

Within the ancient Mayan society, the royals were not just political leaders of their particular city-states, they were priest-kings and priest-queens. They served as the conduit to the divine, deriving their wisdom for guiding their people through their connection with the Heart of the Earth and the Heart of the Sky. This wisdom enriched both the ruling dynasty and their people, as they would be working in harmony with the gods. Thus the ruler of the city was also the physical embodiment of the divine, and it is to this that Ajpu is so closely related. Likewise it represents our potential, the state of divinity to which we may aspire.

Ajpu represents the holiness in life, the divinity in the physical world, and our search for it. It is that moment when you look closely at a flower to see the beautiful detail, the moment when you see the magnificence of the landscape you live within, the beauty in your child’s eyes. It is the random act of kindness that restores our faith in humanity. It is the search for the underlying meaning in all situations, understanding that each person is a part of the whole. Whether we like it or not, and however we judge it, we are all a part of creation. Our every action, and every action of others gives us the opportunity to explore ourselves and our reaction, whether we are attracted or repelled by the action of others. However, sometimes Ajpu can lead us to become immersed in the other world, to lose sight of reality, it is important to remember to stay in touch with the Heart of the Earth as we reach to the Heart of the Sky.

The number 4 is very important within Mayan mythology. Four represents the cardinal points, the four colours of maize, the four carriers of the year, the two equinoxes and two solstices, as well as midnight, sunrise, midday and sunset. The number four is representative of the four first men, who raised the sky from the sea to create the world we live on. In Mayan myth it is four pillars that support the sky from the Earth. As you can imagine, four is a number which represents stability, a solar number. Even though it is still low, it is thought of as a beneficial number.

10 Ajpu (10th March 2017)

10 AjpuThe nawal Ajpu encourages us to search for the holy, while the number 10 represents society. Whilst we may see problems within our communities, the energy of Ajpu helps us look for the good side today.

Isolation may have its beneficial moments, for reflection and introspection, but for humans to flourish, being part of a bigger community usually benefits all within it. It often not a perfect solution for all within the community, nothing is one size fits all, and so there will always be a certain amount of discontent. It is easy to focus on problems, they tend to be the things which cause the immediate discomfort and so attract the most attention. They sometimes draw our focus so much that we lose sight of the original reasons for joining a community, the original dreams of being at peace with our neighbours, acting in unity and creating a more prosperous environment for our future generations.

The nawal Ajpu does represent the search for divinity, the highest form of good, however this search can begin just by remembering to see the everyday good in what is around us. With the number 10 bringing this focus onto community, today is a day which strongly suggests that we look at the positive elements of the community to which we belong. By extending our love and friendship into our communities, we have the possibility to create something greater than the sum of its parts and more divine than we can create alone.

Community working together. Tata Isaias, Nana Isabel, Nana Ingrid and me making fire ceremony at the Harvest Festival. Two women and two men combining Kaqchikel, Spanish and English in a ceremony to bridge the communities living together in San Marcos La Laguna. Picture by Tamila Timm
Community working together. Tata Isaias, Nana Isabel, Nana Ingrid and me making fire ceremony at the Harvest Festival. Two women and two men combining Kaqchikel, Spanish and English in a ceremony to bridge the communities living together in San Marcos La Laguna. Picture by Tamila Timm

Nawal Ajpu is once again a nawal with a multitude of meanings and translations. In the Yucatec language it is known as Ahau, in Kiche is is also known as Junajpu. These are in turn variously translated into English as lord, hunter, blow gunner, flower and sun. Each one of the translations has it’s merits, and represents an aspect of this auspicious nawal.

Within the ancient Mayan society, the royals were not just political leaders of their particular city-states, they were priest-kings and priest-queens. They served as the conduit to the divine, deriving their wisdom for guiding their people through their connection with the Heart of the Earth and the Heart of the Sky. This wisdom enriched both the ruling dynasty and their people, as they would be working in harmony with the gods. Thus the ruler of the city was also the physical embodiment of the divine, and it is to this that Ajpu is so closely related. Likewise it represents our potential, the state of divinity to which we may aspire.

Ajpu represents the holiness in life, the divinity in the physical world, and our search for it. It is that moment when you look closely at a flower to see the beautiful detail, the moment when you see the magnificence of the landscape you live within, the beauty in your child’s eyes. It is the random act of kindness that restores our faith in humanity. It is the search for the underlying meaning in all situations, understanding that each person is a part of the whole. Whether we like it or not, and however we judge it, we are all a part of creation. Our every action, and every action of others gives us the opportunity to explore ourselves and our reaction, whether we are attracted or repelled by the action of others. However, sometimes Ajpu can lead us to become immersed in the other world, to lose sight of reality, it is important to remember to stay in touch with the Heart of the Earth as we reach to the Heart of the Sky.

The number 10 is another number which demonstrates the connection between the sacred calendar and the human body. As five represents one hand, ten represents two hands coming together. This can be seen as the shaking of hands creating agreement between people. Ten is seen as a good number, a number of community and the laws of society, of people acting in harmony with each other.