4 Toj (29th December 2016)

4 TojThe nawal Toj brings with it the appropriate time to make a payment, but today this is very much something which should apply to the physical reality. It is a day to pay off your physical debts and allow others to pay theirs.

Our debts weigh heavily on our energy, whether they are big karmic debts or that $10 you forgot to give back to someone. It does’t matter if it is only a tiny debt, in fact those you forget are the ones which mount up. They connect both the debter and the lender, nibbling away at their energy and causing both an imbalance and and unnecessary attachment. The theme of this trecena of Kame is spiritual transformation, and this is difficult to undergo when such physical attachments are present.

Big debts can be very detrimental to the health, but may also be difficult to clear. Small ones might be more manageable. Sometimes just an acknowledgement towards the person you owe may go a long way to creating harmony, just by showing you haven’t forgotten. Likewise, it is important to remind others of their debt towards you, even if you feel awkward doing this. The energy goes both ways and it is better to clear it. Of course it doesn’t have to be about money, it may be that you owe the most precious of commodities, time.

Today is a day to repay favours, if nothing is asked for then why not just do something nice for someone who has helped you out in the past. If you haven’t got anyone to repay, then this would be an excellent day for a random act of kindness towards a complete stranger.

Toj helps to bring health and well being when payments are made, and so making physical payments today can help to heal divides within your community and bring transformation.

Community working together. Tata Isaias, Nana Isabel, Nana Ingrid and me making fire ceremony at the Harvest Festival. Two women and two men combining Kaqchikel, Spanish and English in a ceremony to bridge the communities living together in San Marcos La Laguna. Picture by Tamila Timm
Community working together. Tata Isaias, Nana Isabel, Nana Ingrid and I making fire ceremony at the Harvest Festival. Two women and two men combining Kaqchikel, Spanish and English in a ceremony to bridge the communities living together in San Marcos La Laguna. Picture by Tamila Timm

The nawal Toj represents offerings and payment. It is part of the name Tojil, a Mayan god who gave fire to the people, although this was not a free gift. Tojil asked in return for sacrifice to be made. This is a day of payment and sacrifice, a day to resolve debts, both in the physical and spiritual realms. Toj is the nawal of the sacred fire, and it is to the fire that we make offerings in order to burn away what would commonly be known as karmic debts. In this way we restore balance, we bring our accounts back to zero.

Toj carries with it a form of divine protection, which is enhanced through selfless acts. These acts might involve a sacrifice of our time or energy in order to strengthen our community. We can choose to act or we can choose to ignore, but be aware – ignoring an opportunity to make a payment on a Toj day might bring a ill fortune, the removal of the protection. Payment should be made with an open heart, thanks might not be quickly forthcoming, and may not come at all. Your sacrifice could be  something as simple as picking up litter in your neighbourhood, it doesn’t have to be something elaborate.

The number 4 is very important within Mayan mythology. Four represents the cardinal points, the four colours of maize, the four carriers of the year, the two equinoxes and two solstices, as well as midnight, sunrise, midday and sunset. The number four is representative of the four first men, who raised the sky from the sea to create the world we live on. In Mayan myth it is four pillars that support the sky from the Earth. As you can imagine, four is a number which represents stability, a solar number. Even though it is still low, it is thought of as a good number.

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