6 Tz’i (24th May 2016)

6 Tz'iWith the nawal Tz’i representing faith and loyalty and the number 6 representing stability, events of today may go some way to stabilising your faith in your world.

As the nawal of unconditional love, Tz’i has the potential to be one of the most altruistic. It is a friendly and helpful energy, which guides and accompanies us on our journeys. Tz’i is instinctual, which is why it sometimes gets into trouble, however, it is those instincts which can also bring out its best aspect. These are also the instincts which bring loyalty through the ability to see past the current surface issue and remain faithful.

Today brings the balanced and stable number 6 together with these qualities. Sometimes life brings moments when we wonder why we are putting our energy into a situation, why we continue to support particular people or ideas. Today can be a day when a wavering doubt becomes stabilised, when your ability to trust your instincts is confirmed. It is a day when your faith in life receives input from not just the physical properties of the four directions, but the divine properties of the Heart of the Sky and Heart of the Earth.

The legal aspect of Tz’i would also suggest that this is a favourable day for matters of justice and the law. The 6 brings a solid and dependable balance, suggesting  that legal matters may be resolved in to a stable outcome.

The number 6 also represents the family, and 6 Tz’i helps you to remember the qualities of  loyalty and unconditional love within your family. If your faith in life or trust in your instinct has been shaken, it may be stabilised today through interaction with your family.

Nawal Tzi brings out the unconditional love and loyalty commonly found in our dogs. Picture by Mark Elmy
Nawal Tzi brings out the unconditional love and loyalty commonly found in our dogs. Picture by Mark Elmy

Tz’i is possibly the nawal with the most colourful reputation. Some describe it as the nawal of “sex, drugs and rock and roll” and it has the possibility to live up to that label. One of the functions an Aj Q’ij (Mayan spiritual guide) performs is divination, usually using red seeds called Tz’ite. If a question is asked about a relationship and Tz’i comes up in the reading, it is seen as a sign of  infidelity. Tz’i is instinctual, and closes its ears to reason when it gets an idea, particularly when it is hormonally driven. This is the worst possible aspect of Tz’i and when it falls down, it does so spectacularly, which is why it tends to be remembered for those events.

However, what is sometimes forgotten is the other side of Tz’i, which is the side more frequently displayed. Just as Tz’i can represent infidelity, it also represents faith and loyalty, and just as it can be the trouble maker, it also represents law. It is the nawal of police, lawyers and judges. Tz’i is unwavering faith, unconditional loyalty. The totem animal of Tz’i is the dog, and through the actions of dogs we can understand both the loyalty aspect, and the instinctual. Tz’i is also the guide and protector on life’s path, ensuring that its charge travels safely. It is a day when your faith or loyalty may be tested,  where your instincts are stimulated. The positive traits of this day give rise to to some of the greatest displays of friendship, but be aware that your loyalty may be tested by temptation.

The number six is said to be the number of ultimate stability. It is the first of the three middle numbers of the cycle, the balance point neither too strong nor too weak. It is a day frequently used for ceremony thanks to its conducive energy. It represents the four directions with the Heart of the Sky and the Heart of the Earth. It also represents family, relating to the six qualities that nourish and hold families together – health, understanding, property, employment, friendship and actions.

The cross at the top of the central hill, Paclom, in Momostenango. Paclom is known as "the six place" and the two armed cross represents the four directions combining with the Heart of the Earth and the Heart of the Sky. This picture was taken on Wajxakib B'atz, February 2010.
The cross at the top of the central hill, Paclom, in Momostenango. Paclom is known as “the six place” and the two armed cross represents the four directions combining with the Heart of the Earth and the Heart of the Sky. This picture was taken on Wajxakib B’atz, February 2010.

Leave a Reply